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Title: Hanford Bulk Vitrification Technology Status

Abstract

Research and testing was initiated in 2003 to support the selection of a supplemental treatment technology for Hanford low-activity wastes (LAWs). AMEC’s bulk vitrification process was chosen for full-scale demonstration, and the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) project was started in 2004. Also known as in-container vitrification™ (ICV™), the bulk vitrification process combines soil, liquid LAW, and additives (B2O3 and ZrO2); dries the mixture; and then vitrifies the material in a batch feed-while-melt process in a refractory lined steel container. The DBVS project was initiated with the intent to engineer, construct, and operate a full-scale bulk vitrification pilot-plant to treat LAW from Tank 241-S-109 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. AMEC is adapting its ICV™ technology for this application with technical and analytical support from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The DBVS project is funded by the DOE Office of River Protection and administered by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. Since the beginning of the selection process in 2003, testing has utilized crucible-scale, engineering-scale, and full-scale bulk vitrification equipment. Crucible-scale testing, coupled with engineering-scale testing, helps establish process limitations of selected glass formulations. Full-scale testing provides critical design verification of the ICV™ process both before and duringmore » operation of the demonstration facility. Initial testing focused on development and validation of the baseline equipment configuration and glass formulation. Subsequent testing was focused on improvements to the baseline configuration. Many improvements have been made to the bulk vitrification system equipment configuration and operating methodology since its original inception. Challenges have been identified and met as part of the parallel testing and design process. A 100% design package for the pilot plant is complete and has been submitted to DOE for review. Additional testing will be performed to support both the DBVS project and LAW treatment for the full Hanford mission. In the near term, this includes testing some key equipment components such as the waste feed dryer and other integrated subsystems, as well as waste form process improvements. Additional testing will be conducted to verify that the system is adaptive to changing feed streams. This paper discusses the progress of the bulk vitrification system from its inception to its current state-of-the-art. Specific attention will be given to the testing and process design improvements that have been completed over the last year. These include the completion of full-scale ICV™ Test FS38C as well as process improvements to the feeding method, temperature control, and molten ionic salt separation control.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1092722
Report Number(s):
PNNL-16370
830403000
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2007 Waste Management Symposium: Global Accomplishments in Environmental and Radioactive Waste Management: Education and Opportunity for the Next Generation of Waste Management Professionals, February 25 - March 1, 2007, Tucson, Arizona
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Witwer, Keith S., Dysland, Eric J., Bagaasen, Larry M., Schlahta, Stephan N., Kim, Dong-Sang, Schweiger, Michael J., and Hrma, Pavel R.. Hanford Bulk Vitrification Technology Status. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Witwer, Keith S., Dysland, Eric J., Bagaasen, Larry M., Schlahta, Stephan N., Kim, Dong-Sang, Schweiger, Michael J., & Hrma, Pavel R.. Hanford Bulk Vitrification Technology Status. United States.
Witwer, Keith S., Dysland, Eric J., Bagaasen, Larry M., Schlahta, Stephan N., Kim, Dong-Sang, Schweiger, Michael J., and Hrma, Pavel R.. Thu . "Hanford Bulk Vitrification Technology Status". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1092722,
title = {Hanford Bulk Vitrification Technology Status},
author = {Witwer, Keith S. and Dysland, Eric J. and Bagaasen, Larry M. and Schlahta, Stephan N. and Kim, Dong-Sang and Schweiger, Michael J. and Hrma, Pavel R.},
abstractNote = {Research and testing was initiated in 2003 to support the selection of a supplemental treatment technology for Hanford low-activity wastes (LAWs). AMEC’s bulk vitrification process was chosen for full-scale demonstration, and the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) project was started in 2004. Also known as in-container vitrification™ (ICV™), the bulk vitrification process combines soil, liquid LAW, and additives (B2O3 and ZrO2); dries the mixture; and then vitrifies the material in a batch feed-while-melt process in a refractory lined steel container. The DBVS project was initiated with the intent to engineer, construct, and operate a full-scale bulk vitrification pilot-plant to treat LAW from Tank 241-S-109 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. AMEC is adapting its ICV™ technology for this application with technical and analytical support from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The DBVS project is funded by the DOE Office of River Protection and administered by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. Since the beginning of the selection process in 2003, testing has utilized crucible-scale, engineering-scale, and full-scale bulk vitrification equipment. Crucible-scale testing, coupled with engineering-scale testing, helps establish process limitations of selected glass formulations. Full-scale testing provides critical design verification of the ICV™ process both before and during operation of the demonstration facility. Initial testing focused on development and validation of the baseline equipment configuration and glass formulation. Subsequent testing was focused on improvements to the baseline configuration. Many improvements have been made to the bulk vitrification system equipment configuration and operating methodology since its original inception. Challenges have been identified and met as part of the parallel testing and design process. A 100% design package for the pilot plant is complete and has been submitted to DOE for review. Additional testing will be performed to support both the DBVS project and LAW treatment for the full Hanford mission. In the near term, this includes testing some key equipment components such as the waste feed dryer and other integrated subsystems, as well as waste form process improvements. Additional testing will be conducted to verify that the system is adaptive to changing feed streams. This paper discusses the progress of the bulk vitrification system from its inception to its current state-of-the-art. Specific attention will be given to the testing and process design improvements that have been completed over the last year. These include the completion of full-scale ICV™ Test FS38C as well as process improvements to the feeding method, temperature control, and molten ionic salt separation control.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 25 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Jan 25 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

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  • Research and testing was initiated in 2003 to support the selection of a supplemental treatment technology for Hanford low-activity wastes (LAWs). AMEC's bulk vitrification process was chosen for full-scale demonstration, and the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) project was started in 2004. Also known as In-Container Vitrification{sup TM} (ICV{sup TM}), the bulk vitrification process combines soil, liquid LAW, and additives (B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2}); dries the mixture; and then vitrifies the material in a batch feed-while-melt process within a disposable, refractory-lined steel container. The DBVS project was initiated with the intent to engineer, construct, and operate a full-scalemore » bulk vitrification pilot-plant to treat LAW from Tank 241-S-109 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. Since the beginning of the selection process in 2003, testing has utilized crucible-scale, engineering-scale, and full-scale bulk vitrification equipment. Crucible-scale testing, coupled with engineering-scale testing, helps establish process limitations of selected glass formulations. Full-scale testing provides critical design verification of the ICV{sup TM} process both before and during operation of the demonstration facility. Initial testing focused on development and validation of the melt container and the glass formulation. Subsequent testing was focused on improvements to the baseline configuration. Challenges have been identified and met as part of the parallel testing and design process. A 100% design package for the pilot plant is complete and has been submitted to DOE for review. Additional testing will be performed to support both the DBVS project and LAW treatment for the full Hanford mission. In the near term, this includes testing some key equipment components such as the waste feed mixer-dryer and other integrated subsystems, as well as waste form process improvements. Additional testing will be conducted to verify that the system is adaptive to changing feed streams. This paper discusses the progress of the bulk vitrification system from its inception to its current state-of- the-art. Specific attention will be given to the testing and process design improvements that have been completed over the last year. These include the completion of full-scale ICV{sup TM} Test FS38C as well as process improvements to the feeding method, temperature control, and molten ionic salt separation control. AMEC is adapting its ICV{sup TM} technology for this application with technical and analytical support from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and design support from DMJN H and N. CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. is the Prime Contractor for the DOE Office of River Protection for the DBVS contract. (authors)« less
  • The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) is managing a program at the Hanford site that will retrieve and treat more than 200 million liters (53 million gal.) of radioactive waste stored in underground storage tanks. The waste was generated over the past 50 years as part of the nation's defense programs. The project baseline calls for the waste to be retrieved from the tanks and partitioned to separate the highly radioactive constituents from the large volumes of chemical waste. These highly radioactive components will be vitrified into glass logs in the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), temporarily stored on themore » Hanford Site, and ultimately disposed of as high-level waste in the offsite national repository. The less radioactive chemical waste, referred to as low-activity waste (LAW), is also planned to be vitrified by the WTP, and then disposed of in approved onsite trenches. However, additional treatment capacity is required in order to complete the pretreatment and immobilization of the tank waste by 2028, which represents a Tri-Party Agreement milestone. To help ensure that the treatment milestones will be met, the Supplemental Treatment Program was undertaken. The program, managed by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., involves several sub-projects each intended to supplement part of the treatment of waste being designed into the WTP. This includes the testing, evaluation, design, and deployment of supplemental LAW treatment and immobilization technologies, retrieval and treatment of mixed TRU waste stored in the Hanford Tanks, and supplemental pre-treatment. Applying one or more supplemental treatment technologies to the LAW has several advantages, including providing additional processing capacity, reducing the planned loading on the WTP, and reducing the need for double-shell tank space for interim storage of LAW. In fiscal year 2003, three potential supplemental treatment technologies were evaluated including grout, steam reforming and bulk vitrification using AMEC's In-Container Vitrification{trademark} process. As an outcome of this work, the hulk vitrification process was recommended for further evaluation. In fiscal year 2004, a follow-on bulk vitrification project was initiated to design, procure, assemble and operate a full-scale bulk vitrification pilot-plant to treat low activity tank waste from Hanford tank 241-S-109 under a Research, Development and Demonstration permit. That project is referred to as the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (or DBVS). The DBVS project will provide a full-scale bulk vitrification demonstration facility that can be used to assess the effectiveness of the bulk vitrification process under actual operating conditions. The pilot-plant is scheduled to commence operations in late 2005. The Supplemental Treatment Program represents a major element of the ORP's strategy to complete the pretreatment and immobilization of tank wastes by 2028. This paper will provide an overview of the bulk vitrification process and the progress in establishing the pilot-plant.« less
  • AMEC Earth & Environmental, Inc. and RWE NUKEM Corporation have teamed to develop and apply a waste pre-treatment and bulk vitrification process for low activity waste (LAW) from Hanford Single Shell Tanks (SSTs). The pretreatment and bulk vitrification process utilizes technologies that have been successfully deployed to remediate both radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes at nuclear power plants, DOE sites, and commercial waste sites in the US and abroad. The process represents an integrated systems approach. The proposed AMEC/NUKEM process follow the extraction and initial segregation activities applied to the tank wastes carried out by others. The first stage ofmore » the process will utilize NUKEM's concentrate dryer (CD) system to concentrate the liquid waste stream. The concentrate will then be mixed with soil or glass formers and loaded into refractory-lined steel containers for bulk vitrification treatment using AMEC's In-Container Vitrification (ICV) process. Following the vitrification step, a lid will be placed on the container of cooled, solidified vitrified waste, and the container transported to the disposal site. The container serves as the melter vessel, the transport container and the disposal container. AMEC and NUKEM participated in the Mission Acceleration Initiative Workshop held in Richland, Washington in April 2000 [1]. An objective of the workshop was to identify selected technologies that could be combined into viable treatment options for treatment of the LAW fraction from selected Hanford waste tanks. AMEC's ICV process combined with NUKEM's CD system and other remote operating capabilities were presented as an integrated solution. The Team's proposed process received some of the highest ratings from the Workshop's review panel. The proposed approach compliments the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) by reducing the amount of waste that the WTP would have to process. When combined with the capabilities of the WTP, the proposed approach will accelerate the tank waste remediation program plan and facilitate meeting the regulatory requirements for the remediation of the Hanford tank wastes. Consequently, the DOE Office of River Protection and CH2MHill Hanford Group identified bulk vitrification as one of the technologies to be investigated in FY03 through a demonstration program [2]. In October 2002, CH2MHill issued a request for proposal for the process development testing, engineering and data package for a non-radioactive (cold) pilot bulk vitrification process, and pre-conceptual engineering of a production bulk vitrification system. With AMEC in the lead, AMEC and NUKEM responded with a proposal. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will support the proposed project as a key subcontractor by providing equipment, facilities, and personnel to support small-scale testing, including the testing on samples of actual tank wastes. This paper will provide an overview of the pre-treatment and bulk vitrification process, summarize the technical benefits the approach offers, and describe the demonstration program that has been developed for the project.« less
  • In June 2004, the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) was initiated with the intent to design, construct, and operate a full-scale bulk vitrification pilot-plant to treat low-activity tank waste from Hanford Tank 241-S-109. The DBVS facility uses In-Container Vitrification{trademark} (ICV{trademark}) at the core of the treatment process. The basic process steps combine liquid low-activity waste (LAW) and glassformers; dry the mixture; and then vitrify the mixture in a batch feed-while-melt process in a refractory lined steel container. Off-gases are processed through a state-of-the-art air pollution control system including sintered-metal filtration, thermal oxidation, acid gas scrubbing, and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)more » and high-efficiency gas adsorber (HEGA) filtration. Testing has focused on development and validation of the waste dryer, ICV, and sintered-metal filters (SMFs) equipment, operations enhancements, and glass formulation. With a parallel testing and design process, testing has allowed improvements to the DBVS equipment configuration and operating methodology, since its original inception. Design improvements include optimization of refractory panels in the ICV, simplifying glassformer addition equipment, increasing the number of waste feed chutes to the ICV, and adding capability for remote clean-out of piping, In addition, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has provided an independent review of the entire DBVS process. While the review did not find any fatal flaws, some technical issues were identified that required a re-evaluation of the DBVS design and subsequent changes to the design. A 100 percent design package for the pilot plant will be completed and submitted to DOE for review in early 2008 that incorporates process improvements substantiated through testing and reviews. This paper provides a description of the bulk vitrification process and a discussion of major equipment design changes that have occurred based on full-scale testing over the past two years and DOE reviews.« less
  • In June 2004, the Bulk Vitrification Project was initiated with the intent to engineer, construct and operate a full-scale bulk vitrification pilot-plant to treat low-activity tank waste from Hanford tank 241-S-109. The project, managed by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., and performed by AMEC Earth and Environmental, Inc. (AMEC), will develop and operate a full-scale demonstration facility to exhibit the effectiveness of the bulk vitrification process under actual operating conditions. Since project initiation, testing has been undertaken using crucible-scale, 1/6 linear (engineering) scale, and full-scale vitrification equipment. Crucible-scale testing, coupled with engineering-scale testing, helps establish process limitations of selected glassmore » formulations. Full-scale testing provides critical design verification of the In Container Vitrification (ICV){sup TM} process both prior to and during operation of the demonstration facility. Beginning in late 2004, several full-scale tests have been performed at AMEC's test site, located adjacent to the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, in Richland, WA. Early testing involved verification of melt startup methodology, followed by subsequent full-melt testing to validate critical design parameters and demonstrate the 'Bottom-Up, Feed While Melt' process. As testing has progressed, design improvements have been identified and incorporated into each successive test. Full scale testing at AMEC's test site is currently scheduled to complete in 2006, with continued full-scale operational testing at the demonstration facility on the Hanford Site starting in 2007. Additional engineering scale testing will validate recommended glass formulations that have been provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This testing is expected to continue through 2006. This paper discusses the progress of the full-scale and engineering scale testing performed to date. Crucible-scale testing, a critical step in developing acceptable glass formulations, along with follow-on glass performance tests, is being performed for AMEC by PNNL, and is discussed in detail by PNNL in a separate, related paper. (authors)« less