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Title: Neutron tomography of particulate filters: A non-destructive investigation tool for applied and industrial research

Abstract

This research describes the development and implementation of high-fidelity neutron imaging and the associated analysis of the images. This advanced capability allows the non-destructive, non-invasive imaging of particulate filters (PFs) and how the deposition of particulate and catalytic washcoat occurs within the filter. The majority of the efforts described here were performed at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) CG-1D neutron imaging beamline at Oak Ridge National Laboratory; the current spatial resolution is approximately 50 μm. The sample holder is equipped with a high-precision rotation stage that allows 3D imaging (i.e., computed tomography) of the sample when combined with computerized reconstruction tools. What enables the neutron-based image is the ability of some elements to absorb or scatter neutrons where other elements allow the neutron to pass through them with negligible interaction. Of particular interest in this study is the scattering of neutrons by hydrogen-containing molecules, such as hydrocarbons (HCs) and/or water, which are adsorbed to the surface of soot, ash and catalytic washcoat. Even so, the interactions with this adsorbed water/HC is low and computational techniques were required to enhance the contrast, primarily a modified simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT). Lastly, this effort describes the following systems: particulate randomly distributedmore » in a PF, ash deposition in PFs, a catalyzed washcoat layer in a PF, and three particulate loadings in a SiC PF.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1092276
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research. Section A, Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment; Journal Volume: 729
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; neutron radiography; iterative reconstruction; computed tomography; particulate filters

Citation Formats

Toops, Todd J., Bilheux, Hassina Z., Voisin, Sophie, Gregor, Jens, Walker, Lakeisha M. H., Strzelec, Andrea, Finney, Charles E. A., and Pihl, Josh A. Neutron tomography of particulate filters: A non-destructive investigation tool for applied and industrial research. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1016/j.nima.2013.08.033.
Toops, Todd J., Bilheux, Hassina Z., Voisin, Sophie, Gregor, Jens, Walker, Lakeisha M. H., Strzelec, Andrea, Finney, Charles E. A., & Pihl, Josh A. Neutron tomography of particulate filters: A non-destructive investigation tool for applied and industrial research. United States. doi:10.1016/j.nima.2013.08.033.
Toops, Todd J., Bilheux, Hassina Z., Voisin, Sophie, Gregor, Jens, Walker, Lakeisha M. H., Strzelec, Andrea, Finney, Charles E. A., and Pihl, Josh A. Mon . "Neutron tomography of particulate filters: A non-destructive investigation tool for applied and industrial research". United States. doi:10.1016/j.nima.2013.08.033.
@article{osti_1092276,
title = {Neutron tomography of particulate filters: A non-destructive investigation tool for applied and industrial research},
author = {Toops, Todd J. and Bilheux, Hassina Z. and Voisin, Sophie and Gregor, Jens and Walker, Lakeisha M. H. and Strzelec, Andrea and Finney, Charles E. A. and Pihl, Josh A.},
abstractNote = {This research describes the development and implementation of high-fidelity neutron imaging and the associated analysis of the images. This advanced capability allows the non-destructive, non-invasive imaging of particulate filters (PFs) and how the deposition of particulate and catalytic washcoat occurs within the filter. The majority of the efforts described here were performed at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) CG-1D neutron imaging beamline at Oak Ridge National Laboratory; the current spatial resolution is approximately 50 μm. The sample holder is equipped with a high-precision rotation stage that allows 3D imaging (i.e., computed tomography) of the sample when combined with computerized reconstruction tools. What enables the neutron-based image is the ability of some elements to absorb or scatter neutrons where other elements allow the neutron to pass through them with negligible interaction. Of particular interest in this study is the scattering of neutrons by hydrogen-containing molecules, such as hydrocarbons (HCs) and/or water, which are adsorbed to the surface of soot, ash and catalytic washcoat. Even so, the interactions with this adsorbed water/HC is low and computational techniques were required to enhance the contrast, primarily a modified simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT). Lastly, this effort describes the following systems: particulate randomly distributed in a PF, ash deposition in PFs, a catalyzed washcoat layer in a PF, and three particulate loadings in a SiC PF.},
doi = {10.1016/j.nima.2013.08.033},
journal = {Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research. Section A, Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment},
number = ,
volume = 729,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 19 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Mon Aug 19 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}
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