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Title: Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report

Abstract

High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE SC Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (SC-24)
OSTI Identifier:
1091180
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/54836-1
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-05ER54836
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; Plasma Jet; High Energy Density Laboratory Plasma; Adiabatic Expansion; Adiabatic Compression

Citation Formats

Chen, Chiping. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.2172/1091180.
Chen, Chiping. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report. United States. doi:10.2172/1091180.
Chen, Chiping. Mon . "Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report". United States. doi:10.2172/1091180. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1091180.
@article{osti_1091180,
title = {Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report},
author = {Chen, Chiping},
abstractNote = {High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.},
doi = {10.2172/1091180},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 26 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Mon Aug 26 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}

Technical Report:

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  • No abstract prepared.
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  • The various implementations of the STUD pulse program (spike trains of uneven duration and delay) for LPI (laser-plasma instability) control were studied in depth, and novel regimes were found. How to generate STUD pulses with large time-bandwidth products, how to measure their optical scattering signatures, and how to experimentally demonstrate their usefulness were explored. Theoretical and numerical studies were conducted on Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) and Crossed Beam Energy Transfer (CBET) including statistical models. We established how LPI can be tamed and gain democratized in space and time. Implementing STUD pulses on NIF was also studied. Future high rep ratemore » lasers and fast diagnostics will aid in the adoption of the whole STUD pulse program for LPI control in High Energy Density Plasmas (HEDP).« less
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