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Title: Characterization of Manganese Oxide Precipitates from Appalachian Coal Mine Drainage Treatment Systems

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1088739
Report Number(s):
SLAC-REPRINT-2013-269
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Appl. Geochem 25:389,2010
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
CHEM

Citation Formats

Tan, H., Zhang, G., Heaney, P.J., Webb, S.M., Burgos, W.D., and /SLAC. Characterization of Manganese Oxide Precipitates from Appalachian Coal Mine Drainage Treatment Systems. United States: N. p., 2013. Web.
Tan, H., Zhang, G., Heaney, P.J., Webb, S.M., Burgos, W.D., & /SLAC. Characterization of Manganese Oxide Precipitates from Appalachian Coal Mine Drainage Treatment Systems. United States.
Tan, H., Zhang, G., Heaney, P.J., Webb, S.M., Burgos, W.D., and /SLAC. Wed . "Characterization of Manganese Oxide Precipitates from Appalachian Coal Mine Drainage Treatment Systems". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1088739,
title = {Characterization of Manganese Oxide Precipitates from Appalachian Coal Mine Drainage Treatment Systems},
author = {Tan, H. and Zhang, G. and Heaney, P.J. and Webb, S.M. and Burgos, W.D. and /SLAC},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {Appl. Geochem 25:389,2010},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jul 24 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Wed Jul 24 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}
  • The removal of Mn(II) from coal mine drainage (CMD) by chemical addition/active treatment can significantly increase treatment costs. Passive treatment for Mn removal involves promotion of biological oxidative precipitation of manganese oxides (MnO{sub x}). Manganese(II) removal was studied in three passive treatment systems in western Pennsylvania that differed based on their influent Mn(II) concentrations (20-150 mg/L), system construction ({+-}inoculation with patented Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria), and bed materials (limestone vs. sandstone). Manganese(II) removal occurred at pH values as low as 5.0 and temperatures as low as 2 C, but was enhanced at circumneutral pH and warmer temperatures. Trace metals such as Zn,more » Ni and Co were removed effectively, in most cases preferentially, into the MnO{sub x} precipitates. Based on synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction and Mn K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, the predominant Mn oxides at all sites were poorly crystalline hexagonal birnessite, triclinic birnessite and todorokite. The surface morphology of the MnOx precipitates from all sites was coarse and 'sponge-like' composed of nm-sized lathes and thin sheets. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), MnO{sub x} precipitates were found in close proximity to both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. The greatest removal efficiency of Mn(II) occurred at the one site with a higher pH in the bed and a higher influent total organic C (TOC) concentration (provided by an upstream wetland). Biological oxidation of Mn(II) driven by heterotrophic activity was most likely the predominant Mn removal mechanism in these systems. Influent water chemistry and Mn(II) oxidation kinetics affected the relative distribution of MnOx mineral assemblages in CMD treatment systems.« less
  • The passive treatment of abandoned mine drainage using wetlands will produce a significant amount of iron rich sludge which will require costly removal and disposal. An alternative to disposal may be the use of this iron oxide material as pigments which could defray some of these costs. In this research, iron deposits from five alkaline mine drainage wetlands were collected and a series of standard tests were run. The tests included loss on ignition, moisture, pH, acid soluble metals, oil absorption, and water soluble matter. The results of these tests were compared to those achieved using commercially available natural andmore » synthetic iron oxides. The results indicate that iron oxides from constructed wetlands have chemical properties that are intermediate to those of natural and synthetic iron oxide products.« less
  • Work at Pennsylvania State University on the treatment of acid mine drainage for the removal of Mn and Fe is reported. The project involves the use of sphagnum moss in settling ponds: this has been shown to be particularly effective in Mn removal. It is suggested that the method may be particularly helpful to small US mine operators who are finding the cost of chemical treatment to comply with Mn discharge limits prohibitive. Field trials of the moss treatment are planned.
  • A metakaolinite-hematite (KH) red pigment was prepared using an ocherous iron oxide sludge recovered from a water treatment plant of an abandoned coal mine. The KH pigment was prepared by heating the kaolinite and the iron oxide sludge at kaolinite's dehydroxylation temperature. Both the raw sludge and the KH specimen were characterised for their colour properties and toxic characteristics. The KH specimen could serve as a pigment for integrally coloured concrete and offers a potential use for the large volumes of the iron oxide sludge collected from mine water treatment plants. - Graphical abstract: A kaolinite based red pigment wasmore » prepared using an ocherous iron oxide sludge recovered from an abandoned coal mine water treatment plant. Display Omitted - Highlights: • A red pigment was prepared by heating a kaolinite and an iron oxide sludge. • The iron oxide and the pigment were characterised for their colour properties. • The red pigment can be a potential element for integrally coloured concrete.« less