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Title: Transmitter passband requirements for imaging radar.

Abstract

In high-power microwave power amplifiers for radar, distortion in both amplitude and phase should generally be expected. Phase distortions can be readily equalized. Some amplitude distortions are more problematic than others. In general, especially for SAR using LFM chirps, low frequency modulations such as gain slopes can be tolerated much better than multiple cycles of ripple across the passband of the waveform.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1088072
Report Number(s):
SAND2012-10688
456419
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Doerry, Armin Walter. Transmitter passband requirements for imaging radar.. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.2172/1088072.
Doerry, Armin Walter. Transmitter passband requirements for imaging radar.. United States. doi:10.2172/1088072.
Doerry, Armin Walter. 2012. "Transmitter passband requirements for imaging radar.". United States. doi:10.2172/1088072. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1088072.
@article{osti_1088072,
title = {Transmitter passband requirements for imaging radar.},
author = {Doerry, Armin Walter},
abstractNote = {In high-power microwave power amplifiers for radar, distortion in both amplitude and phase should generally be expected. Phase distortions can be readily equalized. Some amplitude distortions are more problematic than others. In general, especially for SAR using LFM chirps, low frequency modulations such as gain slopes can be tolerated much better than multiple cycles of ripple across the passband of the waveform.},
doi = {10.2172/1088072},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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