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Title: Superconducting nanostructured materials.

Abstract

Within the last year it has been realized that the remarkable properties of superconducting thin films containing a periodic array of defects (such as sub-micron sized holes) offer a new route for developing a novel superconducting materials based on precise control of microstructure by modern photolithography. A superconductor is a material which, when cooled below a certain temperature, loses all resistance to electricity. This means that superconducting materials can carry large electrical currents without any energy loss--but there are limits to how much current can flow before superconductivity is destroyed. The current at which superconductivity breaks down is called the critical current. The value of the critical current is determined by the balance of Lorentz forces and pinning forces acting on the flux lines in the superconductor. Lorentz forces proportional to the current flow tend to drive the flux lines into motion, which dissipates energy and destroys zero resistance. Pinning forces created by isolated defects in the microstructure oppose flux line motion and increase the critical current. Many kinds of artificial pinning centers have been proposed and developed to increase critical current performance, ranging from dispersal of small non-superconducting second phases to creation of defects by proton, neutron or heavymore » ion irradiation. In all of these methods, the pinning centers are randomly distributed over the superconducting material, causing them to operate well below their maximum efficiency. We are overcome this drawback by creating pinning centers in aperiodic lattice (see Fig 1) so that each pin site interacts strongly with only one or a few flux lines.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
10878
Report Number(s):
ANL/MSD/CP-96784
TRN: US0103899
DOE Contract Number:  
W-31109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 194th Electrochemical Society Meeting, Boston, MA (US), 11/01/1998--11/06/1998; Other Information: PBD: 13 Jul 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CRITICAL CURRENT; CRYSTAL DEFECTS; LORENTZ FORCE; MAGNETIC FLUX; MICROSTRUCTURE; SUPERCONDUCTIVITY; SUPERCONDUCTORS; FABRICATION

Citation Formats

Metlushko, V. Superconducting nanostructured materials.. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Metlushko, V. Superconducting nanostructured materials.. United States.
Metlushko, V. Mon . "Superconducting nanostructured materials.". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10878.
@article{osti_10878,
title = {Superconducting nanostructured materials.},
author = {Metlushko, V.},
abstractNote = {Within the last year it has been realized that the remarkable properties of superconducting thin films containing a periodic array of defects (such as sub-micron sized holes) offer a new route for developing a novel superconducting materials based on precise control of microstructure by modern photolithography. A superconductor is a material which, when cooled below a certain temperature, loses all resistance to electricity. This means that superconducting materials can carry large electrical currents without any energy loss--but there are limits to how much current can flow before superconductivity is destroyed. The current at which superconductivity breaks down is called the critical current. The value of the critical current is determined by the balance of Lorentz forces and pinning forces acting on the flux lines in the superconductor. Lorentz forces proportional to the current flow tend to drive the flux lines into motion, which dissipates energy and destroys zero resistance. Pinning forces created by isolated defects in the microstructure oppose flux line motion and increase the critical current. Many kinds of artificial pinning centers have been proposed and developed to increase critical current performance, ranging from dispersal of small non-superconducting second phases to creation of defects by proton, neutron or heavy ion irradiation. In all of these methods, the pinning centers are randomly distributed over the superconducting material, causing them to operate well below their maximum efficiency. We are overcome this drawback by creating pinning centers in aperiodic lattice (see Fig 1) so that each pin site interacts strongly with only one or a few flux lines.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 13 00:00:00 EDT 1998},
month = {Mon Jul 13 00:00:00 EDT 1998}
}

Conference:
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