skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Remote Measurement of Heat Flux from Power Plant Cooling Lakes

Abstract

Laboratory experiments have demonstrated a correlation between the rate of heat loss q" from an experimental fluid to the air above and the standard deviation σ of the thermal variability in images of the fluid surface. These experimental results imply that q" can be derived directly from thermal imagery by computing σ. This paper analyses thermal imagery collected over two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the same relationship exists. Turbulent boundary layer theory predicts a linear relationship between q" and σ when both forced (wind driven) and free (buoyancy driven) convection are present. Datasets derived from ground- and helicopter-based imagery collections had correlation coefficients between σ and q" of 0.45 and 0.76, respectively. Values of q" computed from a function of σ and friction velocity u* derived from turbulent boundary layer theory had higher correlations with measured values of q" (0.84 and 0.89). Finally, this research may be applicable to the problem of calculating losses of heat from the ocean to the atmosphere during high-latitude cold-air outbreaks because it does not require the information typically needed to compute sensible, evaporative, and thermal radiation energy losses to the atmosphere.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1084433
Report Number(s):
SRNL-STI-2012-00609
Journal ID: ISSN 1558-8424
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC09-08SR22470
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology; Journal Volume: 52; Journal Issue: 6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Convective-scale processes, Fluxes, Heat budgets/fluxes, Heating

Citation Formats

Garrett, Alfred J., Kurzeja, Robert J., Villa-Aleman, Eliel, Bollinger, James S., and Pendergast, Malcolm M.. Remote Measurement of Heat Flux from Power Plant Cooling Lakes. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.1175/JAMC-D-12-0158.1.
Garrett, Alfred J., Kurzeja, Robert J., Villa-Aleman, Eliel, Bollinger, James S., & Pendergast, Malcolm M.. Remote Measurement of Heat Flux from Power Plant Cooling Lakes. United States. doi:10.1175/JAMC-D-12-0158.1.
Garrett, Alfred J., Kurzeja, Robert J., Villa-Aleman, Eliel, Bollinger, James S., and Pendergast, Malcolm M.. Sat . "Remote Measurement of Heat Flux from Power Plant Cooling Lakes". United States. doi:10.1175/JAMC-D-12-0158.1.
@article{osti_1084433,
title = {Remote Measurement of Heat Flux from Power Plant Cooling Lakes},
author = {Garrett, Alfred J. and Kurzeja, Robert J. and Villa-Aleman, Eliel and Bollinger, James S. and Pendergast, Malcolm M.},
abstractNote = {Laboratory experiments have demonstrated a correlation between the rate of heat loss q" from an experimental fluid to the air above and the standard deviation σ of the thermal variability in images of the fluid surface. These experimental results imply that q" can be derived directly from thermal imagery by computing σ. This paper analyses thermal imagery collected over two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the same relationship exists. Turbulent boundary layer theory predicts a linear relationship between q" and σ when both forced (wind driven) and free (buoyancy driven) convection are present. Datasets derived from ground- and helicopter-based imagery collections had correlation coefficients between σ and q" of 0.45 and 0.76, respectively. Values of q" computed from a function of σ and friction velocity u* derived from turbulent boundary layer theory had higher correlations with measured values of q" (0.84 and 0.89). Finally, this research may be applicable to the problem of calculating losses of heat from the ocean to the atmosphere during high-latitude cold-air outbreaks because it does not require the information typically needed to compute sensible, evaporative, and thermal radiation energy losses to the atmosphere.},
doi = {10.1175/JAMC-D-12-0158.1},
journal = {Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology},
number = 6,
volume = 52,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013},
month = {Sat Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2013}
}