skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Ceramic technology report. Semi-annual progress report, April 1994--September 1994

Abstract

The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported (advanced gas turbine and low-heat-rejection diesel engines) to include near-term (5-10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, othermore » industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned. The work elements are as follows: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, low-expansion ceramics, and testing and data base development.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
108142
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-12924
ON: DE96000294; TRN: 95:007111
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Jun 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CERAMICS; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; PROGRESS REPORT; MACHINING; PROCESSING; POWDERS; FRACTURE PROPERTIES; CORROSION; SINTERING; MICROSTRUCTURE; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; GRINDING

Citation Formats

Johnson, D.R. Ceramic technology report. Semi-annual progress report, April 1994--September 1994. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.2172/108142.
Johnson, D.R. Ceramic technology report. Semi-annual progress report, April 1994--September 1994. United States. doi:10.2172/108142.
Johnson, D.R. Thu . "Ceramic technology report. Semi-annual progress report, April 1994--September 1994". United States. doi:10.2172/108142. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/108142.
@article{osti_108142,
title = {Ceramic technology report. Semi-annual progress report, April 1994--September 1994},
author = {Johnson, D.R.},
abstractNote = {The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported (advanced gas turbine and low-heat-rejection diesel engines) to include near-term (5-10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned. The work elements are as follows: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, low-expansion ceramics, and testing and data base development.},
doi = {10.2172/108142},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1995},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 1995}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: