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Title: Agronomic Suitability of Bioenergy Crops in Mississippi

Abstract

In Mississippi, some questions need to be answered about bioenergy crops: how much suitable land is available? How much material can that land produce? Which production systems work best in which scenarios? What levels of inputs will be required for productivity and longterm sustainability? How will the crops reach the market? What kinds of infrastructure will be necessary to make that happen? This publication helps answer these questions: • Which areas in the state are best for bioenergy crop production? • How much could these areas produce sustainably? • How can bioenergy crops impact carbon sequestration and carbon credits? • How will these crops affect fertilizer use and water quality? • What kind of water management is needed to maintain a productive crop? The answers to these questions will help supporting institutions across the state to improve land assessment and agronomic management practices for biomass production. In the last decade, energy supply has become a worldwide problem. Bioenergy crops could supply energy in the future. Bioenergy crops are plants, usually perennial grasses and trees, that produce a lot of biomass that can be converted into energy. Bioenergy crops can be grown for two energy markets: power generation, such as heatmore » and electricity, or liquid fuel, such as cellulosic ethanol. These resources could reduce petroleum dependency and greenhouse gas production. Woody plants and herbaceous warm-season grasses, such as switchgrass, giant miscanthus,energy cane, and high yielding sorghums, could be major sources of biomass in Mississippi.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Mississippi State University
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1079588
Report Number(s):
GO8602511
DOE Contract Number:  
FG36-06GO86025
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Lemus, Rocky, Baldwin, Brian, and Lang, David. Agronomic Suitability of Bioenergy Crops in Mississippi. United States: N. p., 2011. Web.
Lemus, Rocky, Baldwin, Brian, & Lang, David. Agronomic Suitability of Bioenergy Crops in Mississippi. United States.
Lemus, Rocky, Baldwin, Brian, and Lang, David. Sat . "Agronomic Suitability of Bioenergy Crops in Mississippi". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1079588.
@article{osti_1079588,
title = {Agronomic Suitability of Bioenergy Crops in Mississippi},
author = {Lemus, Rocky and Baldwin, Brian and Lang, David},
abstractNote = {In Mississippi, some questions need to be answered about bioenergy crops: how much suitable land is available? How much material can that land produce? Which production systems work best in which scenarios? What levels of inputs will be required for productivity and longterm sustainability? How will the crops reach the market? What kinds of infrastructure will be necessary to make that happen? This publication helps answer these questions: • Which areas in the state are best for bioenergy crop production? • How much could these areas produce sustainably? • How can bioenergy crops impact carbon sequestration and carbon credits? • How will these crops affect fertilizer use and water quality? • What kind of water management is needed to maintain a productive crop? The answers to these questions will help supporting institutions across the state to improve land assessment and agronomic management practices for biomass production. In the last decade, energy supply has become a worldwide problem. Bioenergy crops could supply energy in the future. Bioenergy crops are plants, usually perennial grasses and trees, that produce a lot of biomass that can be converted into energy. Bioenergy crops can be grown for two energy markets: power generation, such as heat and electricity, or liquid fuel, such as cellulosic ethanol. These resources could reduce petroleum dependency and greenhouse gas production. Woody plants and herbaceous warm-season grasses, such as switchgrass, giant miscanthus,energy cane, and high yielding sorghums, could be major sources of biomass in Mississippi.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {10}
}