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Title: Non-Destructive Testing A Developing Tool in Science and Engineering

Abstract

Non-destructive testing (NDT), sometimes also known as non-destructive inspection (NDI) or non-destructive examination (NDE), has been applied to solve a wide range of science and industry problems including construction, aerospace, nuclear engineering, manufacturing, space exploration, art objects, forensic studies, biological and medical fields, etc. Without any permanent changing or alteration of testing objects, NDT methods provide great advantages such as increased testing reliability, efficiency, and safety, as well as reduced time and cost. Since the second half of the 20th century, NDT technology has seen significant growth. Depending on the physical properties being measured, NDT techniques can be classified into several branches. This article will provide a brief overview of commonly used NDT methods and their up-to-date progresses including optical examination, radiography, acoustic emission, ultrasonic testing and eddy current testing. For extended reviews on many presently used NDT methods, please refer to articles by Mullins [1, 2].

Authors:
 [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1073681
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Advanced Materials and Processes; Journal Volume: 171; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Lin, Lianshan. Non-Destructive Testing A Developing Tool in Science and Engineering. United States: N. p., 2013. Web.
Lin, Lianshan. Non-Destructive Testing A Developing Tool in Science and Engineering. United States.
Lin, Lianshan. 2013. "Non-Destructive Testing A Developing Tool in Science and Engineering". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1073681,
title = {Non-Destructive Testing A Developing Tool in Science and Engineering},
author = {Lin, Lianshan},
abstractNote = {Non-destructive testing (NDT), sometimes also known as non-destructive inspection (NDI) or non-destructive examination (NDE), has been applied to solve a wide range of science and industry problems including construction, aerospace, nuclear engineering, manufacturing, space exploration, art objects, forensic studies, biological and medical fields, etc. Without any permanent changing or alteration of testing objects, NDT methods provide great advantages such as increased testing reliability, efficiency, and safety, as well as reduced time and cost. Since the second half of the 20th century, NDT technology has seen significant growth. Depending on the physical properties being measured, NDT techniques can be classified into several branches. This article will provide a brief overview of commonly used NDT methods and their up-to-date progresses including optical examination, radiography, acoustic emission, ultrasonic testing and eddy current testing. For extended reviews on many presently used NDT methods, please refer to articles by Mullins [1, 2].},
doi = {},
journal = {Advanced Materials and Processes},
number = 4,
volume = 171,
place = {United States},
year = 2013,
month = 1
}
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