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Title: Lattice strain of osmium diboride under high pressure and nonhydrostatic stress

Abstract

The lattice strain behavior of osmium diboride—a member of a group of third-row transition metal borides associated with hard/superhard behavior—has been studied using radial diffraction in a diamond anvil cell under high pressure and non-hydrostatic stress. We interpret the average values of the measured lattice strains as a lower-bound to the lattice-plane dependent yield strengths using existing estimates for the elastic constants of OsB2, with a yield strength of 11 GPa at 27.5 GPa of hydrostaticpressure. The measured differential lattice strains show significant plane-dependent anisotropy, with the (101) lattice plane showing the largest differential strain and the (001) lattice plane showing the least strain. At the highest pressure, the a-axis develops a larger compressive strain and supports a larger differential strain than either the b or c axes. This causes an increase in the c/a ratio and a decrease in the a/b ratio especially in the maximum stress direction. The large strength anisotropy of this material points to possible ways to modulate directional mechanical properties by taking advantage of the interplay between aggregate polycrystalline texture with directional mechanical properties.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY (BNL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE SC OFFICE OF SCIENCE (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1069635
Report Number(s):
BNL-100207-2013-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979; JAPIAU
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Applied Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 112; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Kavner, Abby, Weinberger, Michelle B., Shahar, Anat, Cumberland, Robert W., Levine, Jonathan B., Kaner, Richard B., and Tolbert, Sarah H. Lattice strain of osmium diboride under high pressure and nonhydrostatic stress. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4730780.
Kavner, Abby, Weinberger, Michelle B., Shahar, Anat, Cumberland, Robert W., Levine, Jonathan B., Kaner, Richard B., & Tolbert, Sarah H. Lattice strain of osmium diboride under high pressure and nonhydrostatic stress. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4730780.
Kavner, Abby, Weinberger, Michelle B., Shahar, Anat, Cumberland, Robert W., Levine, Jonathan B., Kaner, Richard B., and Tolbert, Sarah H. Sun . "Lattice strain of osmium diboride under high pressure and nonhydrostatic stress". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4730780.
@article{osti_1069635,
title = {Lattice strain of osmium diboride under high pressure and nonhydrostatic stress},
author = {Kavner, Abby and Weinberger, Michelle B. and Shahar, Anat and Cumberland, Robert W. and Levine, Jonathan B. and Kaner, Richard B. and Tolbert, Sarah H.},
abstractNote = {The lattice strain behavior of osmium diboride—a member of a group of third-row transition metal borides associated with hard/superhard behavior—has been studied using radial diffraction in a diamond anvil cell under high pressure and non-hydrostatic stress. We interpret the average values of the measured lattice strains as a lower-bound to the lattice-plane dependent yield strengths using existing estimates for the elastic constants of OsB2, with a yield strength of 11 GPa at 27.5 GPa of hydrostaticpressure. The measured differential lattice strains show significant plane-dependent anisotropy, with the (101) lattice plane showing the largest differential strain and the (001) lattice plane showing the least strain. At the highest pressure, the a-axis develops a larger compressive strain and supports a larger differential strain than either the b or c axes. This causes an increase in the c/a ratio and a decrease in the a/b ratio especially in the maximum stress direction. The large strength anisotropy of this material points to possible ways to modulate directional mechanical properties by taking advantage of the interplay between aggregate polycrystalline texture with directional mechanical properties.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4730780},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
issn = {0021-8979},
number = 1,
volume = 112,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {1}
}