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Title: Former worekrs' notification adn medical screening Hanford

Abstract

CPWR is carrying out a screening program for former Hanford construction workers. This program includes continuing screening and re-screening services for the former worker population. The Program contains the following general components: Start-up planning/needs assessment: A modified exposure assessment will be conducted to identify high-risk buildings or areas, primary exposures, and worker populations at risk. Outreach: CPWR, as the research arm of the Building and Construction Trades Department, AFL-CIO, has direct access to workers. CPWR will rely on direct mailings to lists of former workers, and work through and rely on existing organizations (unions, union pension funds, employers, DOE site administrators, etc.) to reach former workers and "get the word out." CPWR will establish/maintain an outreach office at each site listed above. This office will serve as the face of the Program to workers and their communities. Communications and intake center: CPWR has two established toll-free phone numbers (1-800-866-9663 and 1-888-464-0009). There is also a dedicated website for the program (btmed.org). Workers can register with the Program by mail, telephone, or on-line. Work history: A standardized, structured work history is administered with modules that accommodate unique exposure scenarios for different occupations and different DOE sites. A work history interview ismore » administered by a trained program interviewer. The work histories are used to determine whether a participant is eligible for the medical examination and to interpret the findings from the medical examination. Medical evaluation: The Program contracts with local medical providers qualified to deliver occupational medical screening services. All providers are credentialed. The Program contracts with a certified national laboratory and with NIOSH certified B-readers to review x-rays. Based on the work history, the participant is referred to a credentialed medical provider who is located close to the participant's home. If it is not convenient to use a credentialed provider, the Program will make arrangements, if necessary, for the participant to receive a physical exam through the National Supplemental Screening Program. Eligible participants will receive the same core medical exam (including a Beryllium Lymphocyte Proliferation Test, BeLPT), and in addition, based on their work history, they may be assigned to exposure specific modules for asbestos, silica, lead, noise, cadmium, and chromium. Lab work will be sent to a national laboratory for processing, except the blood samples for the BeLPT, which will be sent to a DOE-approved laboratory for evaluation. Determination of work-relatedness and follow-up: A letter of findings will be sent to the participant within 60 days of the exam. The letter is written and/or reviewed by occupational medical health personnel with knowledge of the DOE site(s) where the participant has worked and will include specific follow-up recommendations. Urgent findings are followed up by the provider without delay. Evaluation and quality assurance: All data are entered into the Program Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is web-based and relies on electronic submission of results, whenever possible. A de-identified data set on all participants is provided to Duke University Medical Center for evaluation and analysis. Each participant is asked to complete a satisfaction survey. The DMS will be used for quality assurance purposes and to also report summary data to the DOE. The BTMED.ORG website is encrypted using the industry-standard Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) technology (128-bit encryption keys). Each individual that accesses the website is assigned a unique login ID, password, and token. Passwords are required to meet standards for "strength," including minimum length, multi-case, and use of numbers. The website is also protected by additional security layers including additional encryption, hardware and software firewalls, Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), and virus protection.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
The Center to Protect Workers Rights
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1067861
Report Number(s):
DE-FC0296SF21262- Final Report
DOE Contract Number:
FC02-96SF21262
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; former construction workers, medical screening, Hanford

Citation Formats

Patricia Quinn. Former worekrs' notification adn medical screening Hanford. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.2172/1067861.
Patricia Quinn. Former worekrs' notification adn medical screening Hanford. United States. doi:10.2172/1067861.
Patricia Quinn. Wed . "Former worekrs' notification adn medical screening Hanford". United States. doi:10.2172/1067861. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1067861.
@article{osti_1067861,
title = {Former worekrs' notification adn medical screening Hanford},
author = {Patricia Quinn},
abstractNote = {CPWR is carrying out a screening program for former Hanford construction workers. This program includes continuing screening and re-screening services for the former worker population. The Program contains the following general components: Start-up planning/needs assessment: A modified exposure assessment will be conducted to identify high-risk buildings or areas, primary exposures, and worker populations at risk. Outreach: CPWR, as the research arm of the Building and Construction Trades Department, AFL-CIO, has direct access to workers. CPWR will rely on direct mailings to lists of former workers, and work through and rely on existing organizations (unions, union pension funds, employers, DOE site administrators, etc.) to reach former workers and "get the word out." CPWR will establish/maintain an outreach office at each site listed above. This office will serve as the face of the Program to workers and their communities. Communications and intake center: CPWR has two established toll-free phone numbers (1-800-866-9663 and 1-888-464-0009). There is also a dedicated website for the program (btmed.org). Workers can register with the Program by mail, telephone, or on-line. Work history: A standardized, structured work history is administered with modules that accommodate unique exposure scenarios for different occupations and different DOE sites. A work history interview is administered by a trained program interviewer. The work histories are used to determine whether a participant is eligible for the medical examination and to interpret the findings from the medical examination. Medical evaluation: The Program contracts with local medical providers qualified to deliver occupational medical screening services. All providers are credentialed. The Program contracts with a certified national laboratory and with NIOSH certified B-readers to review x-rays. Based on the work history, the participant is referred to a credentialed medical provider who is located close to the participant's home. If it is not convenient to use a credentialed provider, the Program will make arrangements, if necessary, for the participant to receive a physical exam through the National Supplemental Screening Program. Eligible participants will receive the same core medical exam (including a Beryllium Lymphocyte Proliferation Test, BeLPT), and in addition, based on their work history, they may be assigned to exposure specific modules for asbestos, silica, lead, noise, cadmium, and chromium. Lab work will be sent to a national laboratory for processing, except the blood samples for the BeLPT, which will be sent to a DOE-approved laboratory for evaluation. Determination of work-relatedness and follow-up: A letter of findings will be sent to the participant within 60 days of the exam. The letter is written and/or reviewed by occupational medical health personnel with knowledge of the DOE site(s) where the participant has worked and will include specific follow-up recommendations. Urgent findings are followed up by the provider without delay. Evaluation and quality assurance: All data are entered into the Program Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is web-based and relies on electronic submission of results, whenever possible. A de-identified data set on all participants is provided to Duke University Medical Center for evaluation and analysis. Each participant is asked to complete a satisfaction survey. The DMS will be used for quality assurance purposes and to also report summary data to the DOE. The BTMED.ORG website is encrypted using the industry-standard Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) technology (128-bit encryption keys). Each individual that accesses the website is assigned a unique login ID, password, and token. Passwords are required to meet standards for "strength," including minimum length, multi-case, and use of numbers. The website is also protected by additional security layers including additional encryption, hardware and software firewalls, Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), and virus protection.},
doi = {10.2172/1067861},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Nov 30 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Wed Nov 30 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The overall objective of this project was to provide medical screening to former workers of Wyman-Gordon Company, Norton Abrasives, and MIT/Nuclear Metals (NMI) in order to prevent and minimize the health impact of diseases caused by site related workplace exposures to beryllium. The program was developed in response to a request by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that had been authorized by Congress in Section 3162 of the 1993 Defense Authorization Act, urging the DOE to carry out a program for the identification and ongoing evaluation of current and former DOE employees who are subjected to significant health risksmore » during such employment." This program, funded by the DOE, was an amendment to the medical surveillance program for former DOE workers at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This program's scope included workers who had worked for organizations that provided beryllium products or materials to the DOE as part of their nuclear weapons program. These organizations have been identified as Beryllium Vendors.« less
  • Medical Screening and surveillance of former DOE workers.
  • As part of a settlement agreement between the US DOE and the State of Texas, DOE proposes to transfer $65 million of federal funds to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNLRC) for construction of the Regional Medical Technology Center (RMTC) to be located in Ellis County, Texas. The RMTC would be a state-of-the-art medical facility for proton cancer therapy, operated by the State of Texas in conjunction with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The RMTC would use the linear accelerator assets of the recently terminated DOE Superconducting Super Collider Project to accelerate protons to high energies formore » the treatment of cancer patients. The current design provides for treatment areas, examination rooms, support laboratories, diagnostic imaging equipment, and office space as well as the accelerators (linac and synchrotron) and beam steering and shaping components. The potential environmental consequences of the proposed action are expected to be minor.« less
  • The Former Radiation Worker Medical Surveillance Program at Rocky Flats was conducted in Arvada, CO, by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education under DOE Contract DE-AC05-00OR22750. Objectives of the program were to obtain information on the value of medical surveillance among at-risk former radiation workers and to provide long-term internal radiation dosimetry information to the scientific community. This program provided the former radiation workers of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (formerly Rocky Flats Plant) an opportunity to receive follow-up medical monitoring and a re-evaluation of their internal radiation dose. The former Rockymore » Flats radiation worker population is distinctive because it was a reasonably stable work force that received occupational exposures, at times substantial, over several decades. This report reflects the summation of health outcomes, statistical analyses, and dose assessment information on former Rocky Flats radiation workers to the date of study termination as of March 2004.« less
  • The Former Hanford Worker Medical Monitoring Program, directed by the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program at the University of Washington, served former production and other non-construction workers who were potentially exposed to workplace hazards while working for the USDOE or its contractors at Hanford. The USDOE Former Workers Program arose from Congressional action in the Defense Authorization of 1993 (Public Law 102). Section 3162 stated that, “The Secretary shall establish and carry out a program for the identification and ongoing medical evaluation of current and former Department of Energy employees who are subject to significant health risks as a resultmore » of exposure of such employees to hazardous or radioactive substances during such employment.” (This also covers former employees of USDOE contractors and subcontractors.) The key objective has been to provide these former workers with medical evaluations in order to determine whether workers have experienced significant risk due to workplace exposure to hazards. Exposures to asbestos, beryllium, and noise can produce specific medical conditions: asbestosis, berylliosis, and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Each of these conditions can be identified by specific, non-invasive screening tests, which are widely available. Treatments are also available for individuals affected by these conditions. This project involved two phases. Phase I involved a needs and risk assessment, characterizing the nature and extent of workplace health hazards which may have increased the risk for long-term health effects. We categorized jobs and tasks by likelihood of exposures to specific workplace health hazards; and located and established contact with former Hanford workers. Phase II involved implementation of medical monitoring programs for former workers whose individual work history indicated significant risk for adverse health effects. We identified 118,000 former workers, employed from 1943 to 1997. After excluding current workers, construction workers, and deceased workers, the total estimated number of former workers eligible for screening was 72,611. By September, 2006, 53,010 workers had been contacted, 20,298 responded, 2,835 were eligible and authorized, and 2,773 workers were ultimately screened. The cohort was 80% male, 85% white, and had a mean age of 63 years (range 24-96 years) at the time of first exam. Participants completed an occupational health history survey prior to the medical exam. Former Hanford workers were considered eligible for an exam if they reported exposure to asbestos, beryllium, or noise, or if a review of their Hanford work history indicated possible or probable exposure to one of these three hazards. We also invited any former Hanford worker who requested an exam to participate, regardless of documentation of exposure. The screening exam included a problem-focused physical exam, along with screening tests for one or more of three specific medical conditions: asbestosis (chest X-ray and spirometry), berylliosis (chest X-ray, spirometry, and beryllium-induced lymphocyte proliferation test), and NIHL (audiometry). We assisted ill workers in filing appropriate workers’ compensation claims, and facilitated appropriate follow-up medical care. This program has made an important contribution to the health of former DOE contractor workers at the Hanford defense nuclear site.« less