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Title: A modular molecular framework for utility in small-molecule solution-processed organic photovoltaic devices

Abstract

We report on the design, synthesis and characterization of light harvesting small molecules for use in solution-processed small molecule bulk heterojunction (SM-BHJ) solar cell devices. These molecular materials are based upon an acceptor/donor/acceptor (A/D/A) core with donor endcapping units. Utilization of a dithieno(3,2-b;2',3'-d)silole (DTS) donor and pyridal[2,1,3]thiadiazole (PT) acceptor leads to strong charge transfer characteristics, resulting in broad optical absorption spectra extending well beyond 700 nm. SM-BHJ solar cell devices fabricated with the specific example 5,5'-bis{7-(4-(5-hexylthiophen-2-yl)thiophen-2-yl)-[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine}-3,3'-di-2-ethylhexylsilylene-2,2'-bithiophene (6) as the donor and [6,6]-phenyl-C 71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC 71BM) as the acceptor component showed short circuit currents above -10 mA cm -2 and power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) over 3%. Thermal processing is a critical factor in obtaining favorable active layer morphologies and high PCE values. A combination of UV-visible spectroscopy, conductive and photo-conductive atomic force microscopies, dynamic secondary mass ion spectrometry (DSIMS), and grazing incident wide angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) experiments were carried out to characterize how thermal treatment influences the active layer structure and organization.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials
  2. Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials and Dept. of Materials
  3. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL)
  4. Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Dept. of Materials
  5. Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials, Center for Polymers and Organic Solids and Dept. of Chemistry & Biochemistry
  6. Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Center for Energy Efficient Materials, Center for Polymers and Organic Solids, Dept. of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Dept. of Materials
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC); Center for Energy Efficient Materials (CEEM)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1065739
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0001009
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Materials Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 34; Related Information: CEEM partners with the University of California, Santa Barbara (lead); Purdue University; Los Alamos National Laboratory; National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Journal ID: ISSN 0959-9428: JMACEP
Publisher:
Royal Society of Chemistry
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; solar (photovoltaic), solid state lighting, phonons, thermoelectric, bio-inspired, energy storage (including batteries and capacitors), electrodes - solar, defects, charge transport, materials and chemistry by design, optics, synthesis (novel materials), synthesis (self-assembly), synthesis (scalable processing)

Citation Formats

Welch, Gregory C., Perez, Louis A., Hoven, Corey V., Zhang, Yuan, Dang, Xuan-Dung, Sharenko, Alexander, Toney, Michael F., Kramer, Edward J., Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen, and Bazan, Guillermo C. A modular molecular framework for utility in small-molecule solution-processed organic photovoltaic devices. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1039/C1JM11963J.
Welch, Gregory C., Perez, Louis A., Hoven, Corey V., Zhang, Yuan, Dang, Xuan-Dung, Sharenko, Alexander, Toney, Michael F., Kramer, Edward J., Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen, & Bazan, Guillermo C. A modular molecular framework for utility in small-molecule solution-processed organic photovoltaic devices. United States. https://doi.org/10.1039/C1JM11963J
Welch, Gregory C., Perez, Louis A., Hoven, Corey V., Zhang, Yuan, Dang, Xuan-Dung, Sharenko, Alexander, Toney, Michael F., Kramer, Edward J., Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen, and Bazan, Guillermo C. Fri . "A modular molecular framework for utility in small-molecule solution-processed organic photovoltaic devices". United States. https://doi.org/10.1039/C1JM11963J.
@article{osti_1065739,
title = {A modular molecular framework for utility in small-molecule solution-processed organic photovoltaic devices},
author = {Welch, Gregory C. and Perez, Louis A. and Hoven, Corey V. and Zhang, Yuan and Dang, Xuan-Dung and Sharenko, Alexander and Toney, Michael F. and Kramer, Edward J. and Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen and Bazan, Guillermo C.},
abstractNote = {We report on the design, synthesis and characterization of light harvesting small molecules for use in solution-processed small molecule bulk heterojunction (SM-BHJ) solar cell devices. These molecular materials are based upon an acceptor/donor/acceptor (A/D/A) core with donor endcapping units. Utilization of a dithieno(3,2-b;2',3'-d)silole (DTS) donor and pyridal[2,1,3]thiadiazole (PT) acceptor leads to strong charge transfer characteristics, resulting in broad optical absorption spectra extending well beyond 700 nm. SM-BHJ solar cell devices fabricated with the specific example 5,5'-bis{7-(4-(5-hexylthiophen-2-yl)thiophen-2-yl)-[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine}-3,3'-di-2-ethylhexylsilylene-2,2'-bithiophene (6) as the donor and [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) as the acceptor component showed short circuit currents above -10 mA cm-2 and power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) over 3%. Thermal processing is a critical factor in obtaining favorable active layer morphologies and high PCE values. A combination of UV-visible spectroscopy, conductive and photo-conductive atomic force microscopies, dynamic secondary mass ion spectrometry (DSIMS), and grazing incident wide angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) experiments were carried out to characterize how thermal treatment influences the active layer structure and organization.},
doi = {10.1039/C1JM11963J},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1065739}, journal = {Journal of Materials Chemistry},
issn = {0959-9428: JMACEP},
number = 34,
volume = 21,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {7}
}