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Title: Effects of seed origin and irrigation on survival and growth of transplanted shrubs

Abstract

Revegetation is difficult in the Mojave Desert due to limited, erratic precipitation and extreme temperatures. Establishing plant cover by transplanting native shrubs is known to be a promising technique, but many questions still remain regarding its use on a large operational scale. A study was initiated on the US Department of Energy Nevada Test Site (NTS) to determine the effects of seed origin and irrigation on survival and growth of transplanted shrubs. Plants of three species (Larrea tridentata, Ambrosia dumosa, and Atriplex canescens) were grown in a greenhouse and hardened outdoors. Plants of all three species were produced from two seed sources: (1) seed collected from the NTS (Mojave Desert), and (2) commercially available seed collected from outside the NTS. One-year-old containerized plants (180 of each species) were transplanted to a site on the NTS and irrigated with two liters of water at one of the following frequencies: (1) at time of planting only, (2) at time of planting and monthly during the first growing season, and (3) at time of planting and twice monthly during the first growing season. After 16 months, survival of all species was generally greater than 80% and was unaffected by irrigation treatments. Survival ofmore » fourwing saltbush was significantly greater from local versus non-local seed. Survival of bursage and creosotebush was generally unaffected by seed origin. Shrub volumes regardless of species or seed origin increased during the first growing season, and then decreased during the second growing season. Shrub volumes for fourwing saltbush were significantly greater for shrubs from local versus non-local seed.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
106545
Report Number(s):
EGG-11265-2019; CONF-9506226-1
ON: DE96000186; TRN: AHC29525%%44
DOE Contract Number:  
AC08-93NV11265
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Conference: 12. American Society for Surface Mining and Reclamation annual meeting: decades later - a time for reassessment, Gillette, WY (United States), 3-8 Jun 1995; Other Information: PBD: [1995]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ARID LANDS; REVEGETATION; SHRUBS; PLANT GROWTH; SEEDS; GERMINATION; GENETIC VARIABILITY; EXPERIMENTAL DATA

Citation Formats

Winkel, V K. Effects of seed origin and irrigation on survival and growth of transplanted shrubs. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.2172/106545.
Winkel, V K. Effects of seed origin and irrigation on survival and growth of transplanted shrubs. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/106545
Winkel, V K. Sun . "Effects of seed origin and irrigation on survival and growth of transplanted shrubs". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/106545. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/106545.
@article{osti_106545,
title = {Effects of seed origin and irrigation on survival and growth of transplanted shrubs},
author = {Winkel, V K},
abstractNote = {Revegetation is difficult in the Mojave Desert due to limited, erratic precipitation and extreme temperatures. Establishing plant cover by transplanting native shrubs is known to be a promising technique, but many questions still remain regarding its use on a large operational scale. A study was initiated on the US Department of Energy Nevada Test Site (NTS) to determine the effects of seed origin and irrigation on survival and growth of transplanted shrubs. Plants of three species (Larrea tridentata, Ambrosia dumosa, and Atriplex canescens) were grown in a greenhouse and hardened outdoors. Plants of all three species were produced from two seed sources: (1) seed collected from the NTS (Mojave Desert), and (2) commercially available seed collected from outside the NTS. One-year-old containerized plants (180 of each species) were transplanted to a site on the NTS and irrigated with two liters of water at one of the following frequencies: (1) at time of planting only, (2) at time of planting and monthly during the first growing season, and (3) at time of planting and twice monthly during the first growing season. After 16 months, survival of all species was generally greater than 80% and was unaffected by irrigation treatments. Survival of fourwing saltbush was significantly greater from local versus non-local seed. Survival of bursage and creosotebush was generally unaffected by seed origin. Shrub volumes regardless of species or seed origin increased during the first growing season, and then decreased during the second growing season. Shrub volumes for fourwing saltbush were significantly greater for shrubs from local versus non-local seed.},
doi = {10.2172/106545},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/106545}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {10}
}