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Title: Toward Nanostructured Thermoelectrics. Synthesis and Characterization of Lead Telluride Gels and Aerogels

Abstract

The synthesis and characterization of lead telluride (PbTe) gels and aerogels with nanostructured features of potential benefit for enhanced thermoelectrics is reported. In this approach, discrete thiolate-capped PbTe nanoparticles were synthesized by a solution-based approach followed by oxidation-induced nanoparticle assembly with tetranitromethane or hydrogen peroxide to form wet gels. Drying of the wet gels by supercritical CO₂ extraction yielded aerogels, whereas xerogels were produced by ambient pressure bench top drying. The gels consist of an interconnected network of colloidal nanoparticles and pores with surface areas up to 74 m² g-1. The thermal stability of the nanostructures relative to nanoparticles was probed with the help of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The aerogels were observed to sublime at a higher temperature and over a larger range (425–500 °C) relative to the precursor nanoparticles. TGA-DSC suggests that organic capping groups can be removed in the region 250–450 °C, and melting of PbTe nanoparticles occurs near the temperature for bulk materials (ca. 920 °C). The good thermal stability combined with the presence of nanoscale interfaces suggests PbTe gels may show promise in thermoelectric devices.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Revolutionary Materials for Solid State Energy Conversion (RMSSEC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES)
OSTI Identifier:
1065266
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0001054
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Materials Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 21; Related Information: RMSSEC partners with Michigan State University (lead); University of California, Los Angeles; University of Michigan; Northwestern University; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Ohio State University; Wayne State University
Publisher:
Royal Society of Chemistry
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; solar (thermal); phonons; thermal conductivity; thermoelectric; mechanical behavior; charge transport; materials and chemistry by design; synthesis (novel materials); synthesis (self-assembly); synthesis (scalable processing)

Citation Formats

Ganguly, Shreyashi, and Brock, Stephanie L. Toward Nanostructured Thermoelectrics. Synthesis and Characterization of Lead Telluride Gels and Aerogels. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1039/C1JM11015B.
Ganguly, Shreyashi, & Brock, Stephanie L. Toward Nanostructured Thermoelectrics. Synthesis and Characterization of Lead Telluride Gels and Aerogels. United States. https://doi.org/10.1039/C1JM11015B
Ganguly, Shreyashi, and Brock, Stephanie L. 2011. "Toward Nanostructured Thermoelectrics. Synthesis and Characterization of Lead Telluride Gels and Aerogels". United States. https://doi.org/10.1039/C1JM11015B.
@article{osti_1065266,
title = {Toward Nanostructured Thermoelectrics. Synthesis and Characterization of Lead Telluride Gels and Aerogels},
author = {Ganguly, Shreyashi and Brock, Stephanie L.},
abstractNote = {The synthesis and characterization of lead telluride (PbTe) gels and aerogels with nanostructured features of potential benefit for enhanced thermoelectrics is reported. In this approach, discrete thiolate-capped PbTe nanoparticles were synthesized by a solution-based approach followed by oxidation-induced nanoparticle assembly with tetranitromethane or hydrogen peroxide to form wet gels. Drying of the wet gels by supercritical CO₂ extraction yielded aerogels, whereas xerogels were produced by ambient pressure bench top drying. The gels consist of an interconnected network of colloidal nanoparticles and pores with surface areas up to 74 m² g-1. The thermal stability of the nanostructures relative to nanoparticles was probed with the help of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The aerogels were observed to sublime at a higher temperature and over a larger range (425–500 °C) relative to the precursor nanoparticles. TGA-DSC suggests that organic capping groups can be removed in the region 250–450 °C, and melting of PbTe nanoparticles occurs near the temperature for bulk materials (ca. 920 °C). The good thermal stability combined with the presence of nanoscale interfaces suggests PbTe gels may show promise in thermoelectric devices.},
doi = {10.1039/C1JM11015B},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1065266}, journal = {Journal of Materials Chemistry},
number = ,
volume = 21,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {5}
}