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Title: Application of real rock pore-throat statistics to a regular pore network model

Abstract

This work reports the application of real rock statistical data to a previously developed regular pore network model in an attempt to produce an accurate simulation tool with low computational overhead. A core plug from the St. Peter Sandstone formation in Indiana was scanned with a high resolution micro CT scanner. The pore-throat statistics of the three-dimensional reconstructed rock were extracted and the distribution of the pore-throat sizes was applied to the regular pore network model. In order to keep the equivalent model regular, only the throat area or the throat radius was varied. Ten realizations of randomly distributed throat sizes were generated to simulate the drainage process and relative permeability was calculated and compared with the experimentally determined values of the original rock sample. The numerical and experimental procedures are explained in detail and the performance of the model in relation to the experimental data is discussed and analyzed. Petrophysical properties such as relative permeability are important in many applied fields such as production of petroleum fluids, enhanced oil recovery, carbon dioxide sequestration, ground water flow, etc. Relative permeability data are used for a wide range of conventional reservoir engineering calculations and in numerical reservoir simulation. Two-phase oil watermore » relative permeability data are generated on the same core plug from both pore network model and experimental procedure. The shape and size of the relative permeability curves were compared and analyzed and good match has been observed for wetting phase relative permeability but for non-wetting phase, simulation results were found to be deviated from the experimental ones. Efforts to determine petrophysical properties of rocks using numerical techniques are to eliminate the necessity of regular core analysis, which can be time consuming and expensive. So a numerical technique is expected to be fast and to produce reliable results. In applied engineering, sometimes quick result with reasonable accuracy is acceptable than the more time consuming results. Present work is an effort to check the accuracy and validity of a previously developed pore network model for obtaining important petrophysical properties of rocks based on cutting-sized sample data. Introduction« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV (United States). In-house Research
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1062712
Report Number(s):
NETL-PUB-67
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: SPE-145751-PP
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING

Citation Formats

Sarker, M.R., McIntyre, D., Ferer, M., Siddigui, S., and Bromhal. G. Application of real rock pore-throat statistics to a regular pore network model. United States: N. p., 2011. Web.
Sarker, M.R., McIntyre, D., Ferer, M., Siddigui, S., & Bromhal. G. Application of real rock pore-throat statistics to a regular pore network model. United States.
Sarker, M.R., McIntyre, D., Ferer, M., Siddigui, S., and Bromhal. G. 2011. "Application of real rock pore-throat statistics to a regular pore network model". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1062712,
title = {Application of real rock pore-throat statistics to a regular pore network model},
author = {Sarker, M.R. and McIntyre, D. and Ferer, M. and Siddigui, S. and Bromhal. G.},
abstractNote = {This work reports the application of real rock statistical data to a previously developed regular pore network model in an attempt to produce an accurate simulation tool with low computational overhead. A core plug from the St. Peter Sandstone formation in Indiana was scanned with a high resolution micro CT scanner. The pore-throat statistics of the three-dimensional reconstructed rock were extracted and the distribution of the pore-throat sizes was applied to the regular pore network model. In order to keep the equivalent model regular, only the throat area or the throat radius was varied. Ten realizations of randomly distributed throat sizes were generated to simulate the drainage process and relative permeability was calculated and compared with the experimentally determined values of the original rock sample. The numerical and experimental procedures are explained in detail and the performance of the model in relation to the experimental data is discussed and analyzed. Petrophysical properties such as relative permeability are important in many applied fields such as production of petroleum fluids, enhanced oil recovery, carbon dioxide sequestration, ground water flow, etc. Relative permeability data are used for a wide range of conventional reservoir engineering calculations and in numerical reservoir simulation. Two-phase oil water relative permeability data are generated on the same core plug from both pore network model and experimental procedure. The shape and size of the relative permeability curves were compared and analyzed and good match has been observed for wetting phase relative permeability but for non-wetting phase, simulation results were found to be deviated from the experimental ones. Efforts to determine petrophysical properties of rocks using numerical techniques are to eliminate the necessity of regular core analysis, which can be time consuming and expensive. So a numerical technique is expected to be fast and to produce reliable results. In applied engineering, sometimes quick result with reasonable accuracy is acceptable than the more time consuming results. Present work is an effort to check the accuracy and validity of a previously developed pore network model for obtaining important petrophysical properties of rocks based on cutting-sized sample data. Introduction},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2011,
month = 1
}

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  • This work reports the application of real rock statistical data to a previously developed regular pore network model in an attempt to produce an accurate simulation tool with low computational overhead. A core plug from the St. Peter Sandstone formation in Indiana was scanned with a high resolution micro CT scanner. The pore-throat statistics of the three-dimensional reconstructed rock were extracted and the distribution of the pore-throat sizes was applied to the regular pore network model. In order to keep the equivalent model regular, only the throat area or the throat radius was varied. Ten realizations of randomly distributed throatmore » sizes were generated to simulate the drainage process and relative permeability was calculated and compared with the experimentally determined values of the original rock sample. The numerical and experimental procedures are explained in detail and the performance of the model in relation to the experimental data is discussed and analyzed. Petrophysical properties such as relative permeability are important in many applied fields such as production of petroleum fluids, enhanced oil recovery, carbon dioxide sequestration, ground water flow, etc. Relative permeability data are used for a wide range of conventional reservoir engineering calculations and in numerical reservoir simulation. Two-phase oil water relative permeability data are generated on the same core plug from both pore network model and experimental procedure. The shape and size of the relative permeability curves were compared and analyzed and good match has been observed for wetting phase relative permeability but for non-wetting phase, simulation results were found to be deviated from the experimental ones. Efforts to determine petrophysical properties of rocks using numerical techniques are to eliminate the necessity of regular core analysis, which can be time consuming and expensive. So a numerical technique is expected to be fast and to produce reliable results. In applied engineering, sometimes quick result with reasonable accuracy is acceptable than the more time consuming results. Present work is an effort to check the accuracy and validity of a previously developed pore network model for obtaining important petrophysical properties of rocks based on cutting-sized sample data.« less
  • We present a pore-network model, based on a pores-and-throats representation of the porous medium, to simulate the generation and mobilization of foams in porous media. The model allows for various parameters or processes, empirically treated in current models, to be quantified and interpreted. Contrary to previous works, we also consider a dynamic (invasion) in addition to a static process. We focus on the properties of the displacement, the onset of foam flow and mobilization, the foam texture and the sweep efficiencies obtained. The model simulates an invasion process, in which gas invades a porous medium occupied by a surfactant solution.more » The controlling parameter is the snap-off probability, which in turn determines the foam quality for various size distributions of pores and throats. For the front to advance, the applied pressure gradient needs to be sufficiently high to displace a series of lamellae along a minimum capillary resistance (threshold) path. We determine this path using a novel algorithm. The fraction of the flowing lamellae, X{sub f} (and, consequently, the fraction of the trapped lamellae, X{sub f}) which are currently empirical, are also calculated. The model allows the delineation of conditions tinder which high-quality (strong) or low-quality (weak) foams form. In either case, the sweep efficiencies in displacements in various media are calculated. In particular, the invasion by foam of low permeability layers during injection in a heterogeneous system is demonstrated.« less
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  • The combination of wireline formation tester pressure measurements with conventional well log water saturation and porosity analysis permit the in-situ determination of a capillary pressure profile, a pore-size distribution profile, the mean effective pore radius, and the rock permeability. In this application of wireline data, multiple point measurements of fluid pressure recorded with the Repeat Formation Tester over the reservoir section define the fluid densities of the saturating fluids and the free water level and permit the calculation of the displacement pressure and the capillary pressure at any level of the reservoir. From these capillary pressure data, the water saturationmore » versus depth profile obtained from the appropriate well log analysis can be transformed into a pore-size distribution profile and the mean effective pore radius can be defined. Variations in pore-size distribution over the vertical section of the reservoir can be recognized and quantified. Furthermore, permeability estimations can be made using the mean effective pore radius and the displacement pressure.« less