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Title: Simulation of Energy Management Systems in EnergyPlus

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Building Technologies Program
OSTI Identifier:
1062491
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proceedings of Building Simulation 2007: 10th Conference of International Building Performance Simulation Association, 3-6 September 2007, Beijing, China; Related Information: See NREL/CP-550-41482 for preprint
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems; Buildings

Citation Formats

Ellis, P. G., Torcellini, P. A., and Crawley, D. B. Simulation of Energy Management Systems in EnergyPlus. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Ellis, P. G., Torcellini, P. A., & Crawley, D. B. Simulation of Energy Management Systems in EnergyPlus. United States.
Ellis, P. G., Torcellini, P. A., and Crawley, D. B. Mon . "Simulation of Energy Management Systems in EnergyPlus". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1062491,
title = {Simulation of Energy Management Systems in EnergyPlus},
author = {Ellis, P. G. and Torcellini, P. A. and Crawley, D. B.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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  • An energy management system (EMS) is a dedicated computer that can be programmed to control all of a building's energy-related systems, including heating, cooling, ventilation, hot water, interior lighting, exterior lighting, on-site power generation, and mechanized systems for shading devices, window actuators, and double facade elements. Recently a new module for simulating an EMS was added to the EnergyPlus whole-building energy simulation program. An essential part of the EMS module is the EnergyPlus Runtime Language (ERL), which is a simple programming language that is used to specify the EMS control algorithms. The new EMS controls and the flexibility of ERLmore » allow EnergyPlus to simulate many novel control strategies that are not possible with the previous generation of building energy simulation programs. This paper surveys the standard controls in EnergyPlus, presents the new EMS features, describes the implementation of the module, and explores some of the possible applications for the new EMS capabilities in EnergyPlus.« less
  • Tedious manual input of data that define a building, its systems and its expected pattern of use and operating schedules for building energy performance simulation has in the past diverted time and resources from productive simulation runs. In addition to its previously released IFCtoIDF utility that semiautomates the import of building geometry, the new IFC HVAC interface to EnergyPlus (released at the end of 2003) makes it possible to import and export most of the data that define HVAC equipment and systems in a building directly from and to other IFC compatible software tools. This reduces the manual input ofmore » other data needed for successful simulation with EnergyPlus to a minimum. The main purpose of this new interface is to enable import of HVAC equipment and systems definitions, generated by other IFC compatible software tools (such as HVAC systems design tools) and data bases, into EnergyPlus, and to write such definitions contained in EnergyPlus input files to the original IFC files from which building geometry was extracted for the particular EnergyPlus input. In addition, this interface sets an example for developers of other software tools how to import and/or export data other than building geometry from and/or into EnergyPlus. This paper describes the necessary simplifications and shortcuts incorporated in this interface, its operating environment, interface architecture, and the basic conditions and methodology for its use with EnergyPlus.« less
  • This paper compares the results from a study conducted at Iowa Energy Center s Energy Resource Station with EnergyPlus simulation results. The building consists of controlled test rooms, dedicated air handling units and air-cooled chillers for the purpose of obtaining quality data suitable for empirical validation studies. Weather data were also collected at the facility and used for the simulation. Empirical validation can be performed on various levels of the program such as zone level, systems level, and plant level. This study is unique in the sense that it integrates the zones, system, and plant into one analysis. For thismore » study, the difference between empirical and EnergyPlus predicted zone cooling loads varied from 1.7% to 10.2%, but the difference for the compressor power was as much as 22.4%. The paper also describes the potential reasons why simulation results might not match field data.« less
  • Many of the popular building energy simulation programs around the world are reaching maturity (and may be reaching senility). Some use simulation methods (and even code) that originated in the 1960s. For more than two decades, the U.S. government has supported development of two hourly building energy simulation programs, BLAST and DOE-2. Designed in the days of mainframe computers, without substantial redesign and/or completely rewriting the programs, expanding their capabilities has become difficult, time-consuming, and expensive. During the same period, analysis and computational methods and power have advanced significantly--providing an opportunity for significant improvement of these tools. In early 1996,more » a federal agency began developing a new building energy simulation took. EnergyPlus, building on development experience with two existing program: DOE-2 and BLAST. EnergyPlus includes a number of innovative simulation features--such as variable time steps, built-in and external modular systems integrated with a heat balance-based zone simulation--and input and output data structures tailored to facilitate third party module and interface development. Other planned simulation capabilities include multizone airflow, and electric power and solar thermal and photovoltaic simulation. Beta testing of EnergyPlus begins in late 1998.« less
  • Many of the popular building energy simulation programs around the world are reaching maturity--some use simulation methods (and even code) that originated in the 1960s. For more than two decades, the US government supported development of two hourly building energy simulation programs, BLAST and DOE-2. Designed in the days of mainframe computers, expanding their capabilities further has become difficult, time-consuming, and expensive. At the same time, the 30 years have seen significant advances in analysis and computational methods and power--providing an opportunity for significant improvement in these tools. In early 1996, a federal agency began developing a new building energymore » simulation tool, EnergyPlus, building on development experience with two existing programs: DOE-2 and BLAST. EnergyPlus includes a number of innovative simulation features--such as variable time steps, built-in template and external modular systems that are integrated with a heat balance-based zone simulation--and input and output data structures tailored to facilitate third party module and interface development. Other planned simulation capabilities include multizone airflow, and electric power and solar thermal and photovoltaic simulation. Beta testing of EnergyPlus begins in early 1999.« less