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Title: Using eigenmodes to perform the inverse problem associated with resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

Abstract

In principle, resonant ultrasonic spectroscopy (RUS) can be used to characterize any parameter that influences the mechanical resonant response of a sample. Examples include the elastic constants, sample dimensions, and crystal orientation. Extracting the parameter of interest involves performing the inverse problem, which typically entails an iterative routine that compares calculated and measured eigenfrequencies. Here, we propose an alternative method based on laser-based resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (LRUS) that uses the eigenmodes. LRUS uses a pulsed laser to thermoelastically excite ultrasound and an interferometer to detect out-of-plane displacement associated with ultrasonic resonances. By raster scanning the probe along the sample surface, an image of the out-ofplane displacement pattern (i.e., eigenmode) is obtained. As an example of this method, we describe a technique to calculate the crystallographic orientation of a single-crystal high-purity copper sample. The crystallographic orientation is computed by comparing theoretical and experimental eigenmodes. The computed angle is shown to be in very good agreement with the angle obtained using electron backscatter diffraction. In addition, a comparison is made using eigenfrequencies and eigenmodes to calculate the crystallographic orientation. It is found for this particular application, the eigenmode method has superior sensitivity to crystal orientation.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - NE
OSTI Identifier:
1060964
Report Number(s):
INL/JOU-12-24390
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 59; Journal Issue: 11
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; crystal orientation; eigenvectors; laser; resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

Citation Formats

David Hurley, and Farhad Farzbod. Using eigenmodes to perform the inverse problem associated with resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. United States: N. p., 2012. Web.
David Hurley, & Farhad Farzbod. Using eigenmodes to perform the inverse problem associated with resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. United States.
David Hurley, and Farhad Farzbod. Thu . "Using eigenmodes to perform the inverse problem associated with resonant ultrasound spectroscopy". United States.
@article{osti_1060964,
title = {Using eigenmodes to perform the inverse problem associated with resonant ultrasound spectroscopy},
author = {David Hurley and Farhad Farzbod},
abstractNote = {In principle, resonant ultrasonic spectroscopy (RUS) can be used to characterize any parameter that influences the mechanical resonant response of a sample. Examples include the elastic constants, sample dimensions, and crystal orientation. Extracting the parameter of interest involves performing the inverse problem, which typically entails an iterative routine that compares calculated and measured eigenfrequencies. Here, we propose an alternative method based on laser-based resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (LRUS) that uses the eigenmodes. LRUS uses a pulsed laser to thermoelastically excite ultrasound and an interferometer to detect out-of-plane displacement associated with ultrasonic resonances. By raster scanning the probe along the sample surface, an image of the out-ofplane displacement pattern (i.e., eigenmode) is obtained. As an example of this method, we describe a technique to calculate the crystallographic orientation of a single-crystal high-purity copper sample. The crystallographic orientation is computed by comparing theoretical and experimental eigenmodes. The computed angle is shown to be in very good agreement with the angle obtained using electron backscatter diffraction. In addition, a comparison is made using eigenfrequencies and eigenmodes to calculate the crystallographic orientation. It is found for this particular application, the eigenmode method has superior sensitivity to crystal orientation.},
doi = {},
journal = {Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control},
number = 11,
volume = 59,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {11}
}