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Title: ISOE Pilot Project Update

Abstract

This slide show introduces the Pilot Project to increase the value of Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) data by increasing participation and amount of data reported from the U.S., reduce the hurdles and effort in participating, streamline the process of reporting and reduce time delay, and eliminate data entry and redundant effort.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS)
OSTI Identifier:
1060538
Report Number(s):
13-OEWH-0076
DOE Contract Number:
4050HD200 1111-000143
Resource Type:
Conference
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS

Citation Formats

D. A. Hagemeyer D. E. Lewis. ISOE Pilot Project Update. United States: N. p., 2012. Web.
D. A. Hagemeyer D. E. Lewis. ISOE Pilot Project Update. United States.
D. A. Hagemeyer D. E. Lewis. Sat . "ISOE Pilot Project Update". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1060538.
@article{osti_1060538,
title = {ISOE Pilot Project Update},
author = {D. A. Hagemeyer D. E. Lewis},
abstractNote = {This slide show introduces the Pilot Project to increase the value of Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE) data by increasing participation and amount of data reported from the U.S., reduce the hurdles and effort in participating, streamline the process of reporting and reduce time delay, and eliminate data entry and redundant effort.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat May 05 00:00:00 EDT 2012},
month = {Sat May 05 00:00:00 EDT 2012}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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