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Title: Experimental Results in DIS from Jefferson Laboratory

Abstract

We are summarizing the experimental program of Jefferson Lab (Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA) in deep inelastic electron scattering. We show recent results and discuss future plans for both the present 6 GeV era and the 12 GeV energy-upgraded facility.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1059426
Report Number(s):
JLAB-PHY-09-921; DOE/OR/23177-0899
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-06OR23177
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proceedings of the XVII International Workshop on Deep-Inelastic Scattering and Related Topics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS

Citation Formats

Sebastian Kuhn. Experimental Results in DIS from Jefferson Laboratory. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.3360/dis.2009.5.
Sebastian Kuhn. Experimental Results in DIS from Jefferson Laboratory. United States. doi:10.3360/dis.2009.5.
Sebastian Kuhn. 2009. "Experimental Results in DIS from Jefferson Laboratory". United States. doi:10.3360/dis.2009.5. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1059426.
@article{osti_1059426,
title = {Experimental Results in DIS from Jefferson Laboratory},
author = {Sebastian Kuhn},
abstractNote = {We are summarizing the experimental program of Jefferson Lab (Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA) in deep inelastic electron scattering. We show recent results and discuss future plans for both the present 6 GeV era and the 12 GeV energy-upgraded facility.},
doi = {10.3360/dis.2009.5},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2009,
month =
}

Conference:
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