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Title: Thermal Properties of LiCl-KCl Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation

Abstract

This project addresses both practical and fundamental scientific issues of direct relevance to operational challenges of the molten LiCl-KCl salt pyrochemical process, while providing avenues for improvements in the process. In order to understand the effects of the continually changing composition of the molten salt bath during the process, the project team will systematically vary the concentrations of rare earth surrogate elements, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium, which will be added to the molten LiCl-KCl salt. They will also perform a limited number of focused experiments by the dissolution of depleted uranium. All experiments will be performed at 500 deg C. The project consists of the following tasks. Researchers will measure density of the molten salts using an instrument specifically designed for this purpose, and will determine the melting points with a differential scanning calorimeter. Knowledge of these properties is essential for salt mass accounting and taking the necessary steps to prevent melt freezing. The team will use cyclic voltammetry studies to determine redox potentials of the rare earth cations, as well as their diffusion coefficients and activities in the molten LiCl-KCl salt. In addition, the team will perform anodic stripping voltammetry to determine the concentration of the rare earthmore » elements and their solubilities, and to develop the scientific basis for an on-line diagnostic system for in situ monitoring of the cation species concentration (rare earths in this case). Solubility and activity of the cation species are critically important for the prediction of the salt's useful lifetime and disposal.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
  2. Idaho National Lab., (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Idaho National Laboratory (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE (United States); Nuclear Energy University Programs (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1058922
Report Number(s):
DOE/NEUP-09-780
TRN: US1300338
DOE Contract Number:  
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES

Citation Formats

Sridharan, Kumar, Allen, Todd, Anderson, Mark, and Simpson, Mike. Thermal Properties of LiCl-KCl Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.2172/1058922.
Sridharan, Kumar, Allen, Todd, Anderson, Mark, & Simpson, Mike. Thermal Properties of LiCl-KCl Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation. United States. doi:10.2172/1058922.
Sridharan, Kumar, Allen, Todd, Anderson, Mark, and Simpson, Mike. Fri . "Thermal Properties of LiCl-KCl Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation". United States. doi:10.2172/1058922. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1058922.
@article{osti_1058922,
title = {Thermal Properties of LiCl-KCl Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation},
author = {Sridharan, Kumar and Allen, Todd and Anderson, Mark and Simpson, Mike},
abstractNote = {This project addresses both practical and fundamental scientific issues of direct relevance to operational challenges of the molten LiCl-KCl salt pyrochemical process, while providing avenues for improvements in the process. In order to understand the effects of the continually changing composition of the molten salt bath during the process, the project team will systematically vary the concentrations of rare earth surrogate elements, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium, which will be added to the molten LiCl-KCl salt. They will also perform a limited number of focused experiments by the dissolution of depleted uranium. All experiments will be performed at 500 deg C. The project consists of the following tasks. Researchers will measure density of the molten salts using an instrument specifically designed for this purpose, and will determine the melting points with a differential scanning calorimeter. Knowledge of these properties is essential for salt mass accounting and taking the necessary steps to prevent melt freezing. The team will use cyclic voltammetry studies to determine redox potentials of the rare earth cations, as well as their diffusion coefficients and activities in the molten LiCl-KCl salt. In addition, the team will perform anodic stripping voltammetry to determine the concentration of the rare earth elements and their solubilities, and to develop the scientific basis for an on-line diagnostic system for in situ monitoring of the cation species concentration (rare earths in this case). Solubility and activity of the cation species are critically important for the prediction of the salt's useful lifetime and disposal.},
doi = {10.2172/1058922},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {11}
}