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Title: WindWaveFloat (WWF): Final Scientific Report

Abstract

Principle Power Inc. and National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) have completed a contract to assess the technical and economic feasibility of integrating wave energy converters into the WindFloat, resulting in a new concept called the WindWaveFloat (WWF). The concentration of several devices on one platform could offer a potential for both economic and operational advantages. Wind and wave energy converters can share the electrical cable and power transfer equipment to transport the electricity to shore. Access to multiple generation devices could be simplified, resulting in cost saving at the operational level. Overall capital costs may also be reduced, provided that the design of the foundation can be adapted to multiple devices with minimum modifications. Finally, the WindWaveFloat confers the ability to increase energy production from individual floating support structures, potentially leading to a reduction in levelized energy costs, an increase in the overall capacity factor, and greater stability of the electrical power delivered to the grid. The research conducted under this grant investigated the integration of several wave energy device types into the WindFloat platform. Several of the resulting system designs demonstrated technical feasibility, but the size and design constraints of the wave energy converters (technical and economic) make themore » WindWaveFloat concept economically unfeasible at this time. Not enough additional generation could be produced to make the additional expense associated with wave energy conversion integration into the WindFloat worthwhile.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Principle Power Inc., Seattle, WA United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1057931
Report Number(s):
DOE/EE0002651-2
DOE Contract Number:  
EE0002651
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; 16 TIDAL AND WAVE POWER; Wave energy, wind energy, offshore wind

Citation Formats

Alla Weinstein, Roddier, Dominique, and Banister, Kevin. WindWaveFloat (WWF): Final Scientific Report. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.2172/1057931.
Alla Weinstein, Roddier, Dominique, & Banister, Kevin. WindWaveFloat (WWF): Final Scientific Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1057931.
Alla Weinstein, Roddier, Dominique, and Banister, Kevin. Fri . "WindWaveFloat (WWF): Final Scientific Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1057931. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1057931.
@article{osti_1057931,
title = {WindWaveFloat (WWF): Final Scientific Report},
author = {Alla Weinstein and Roddier, Dominique and Banister, Kevin},
abstractNote = {Principle Power Inc. and National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) have completed a contract to assess the technical and economic feasibility of integrating wave energy converters into the WindFloat, resulting in a new concept called the WindWaveFloat (WWF). The concentration of several devices on one platform could offer a potential for both economic and operational advantages. Wind and wave energy converters can share the electrical cable and power transfer equipment to transport the electricity to shore. Access to multiple generation devices could be simplified, resulting in cost saving at the operational level. Overall capital costs may also be reduced, provided that the design of the foundation can be adapted to multiple devices with minimum modifications. Finally, the WindWaveFloat confers the ability to increase energy production from individual floating support structures, potentially leading to a reduction in levelized energy costs, an increase in the overall capacity factor, and greater stability of the electrical power delivered to the grid. The research conducted under this grant investigated the integration of several wave energy device types into the WindFloat platform. Several of the resulting system designs demonstrated technical feasibility, but the size and design constraints of the wave energy converters (technical and economic) make the WindWaveFloat concept economically unfeasible at this time. Not enough additional generation could be produced to make the additional expense associated with wave energy conversion integration into the WindFloat worthwhile.},
doi = {10.2172/1057931},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {3}
}