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Title: Microdistribution and Long-Term Retention of 239Pu (NO3)4 in the Respiratory Tracts of an Acutely Exposed Plutonium Worker and Experimental Beagle Dogs

Abstract

The long-term retention of inhaled soluble forms of plutonium raises concerns as to the potential health effects in persons working in nuclear energy or the nuclear weapons program. The distributions of long-term retained inhaled plutonium-nitrate [239Pu (NO3)4] deposited in the lungs of an accidentally exposed nuclear worker (Human Case 0269) and in the lungs of experimentally exposed beagle dogs with varying initial lung depositions were determined via autoradiographs of selected histological lung, lymph node, trachea, and nasal turbinate tissue sections. These studies showed that both the human and dogs had a non-uniform distribution of plutonium throughout the lung tissue. Fibrotic scar tissue effectively encapsulated a portion of the plutonium and prevented its clearance from the body or translocation to other tissues and diminished dose to organ parenchyma. Alpha radiation activity from deposited plutonium in Human Case 0269 was observed primarily along the sub-pleural regions while no alpha activity was seen in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of this individual. However, relatively high activity levels in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of the beagles indicated the lymphatic system was effective in clearing deposited plutonium from the lung tissues. In both the human case and beagle dogs, the appearance of retained plutonium within themore » respiratory tract was inconsistent with current biokinetic models of clearance for soluble forms of plutonium. Bound plutonium can have a marked effect on the dose to the lungs and subsequent radiation exposure has the potential increase in cancer risk.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1057822
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-87930
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Cancer Research, 72(21):5529-5536
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Cancer Research, 72(21):5529-5536
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Nielsen, Christopher E., Wilson, Dulaney A., Brooks, Antone L., McCord, Stacey, Dagle, Gerald E., James, Anthony C., Tolmachev, Sergei Y., Thrall, Brian D., and Morgan, William F. Microdistribution and Long-Term Retention of 239Pu (NO3)4 in the Respiratory Tracts of an Acutely Exposed Plutonium Worker and Experimental Beagle Dogs. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-12-1824.
Nielsen, Christopher E., Wilson, Dulaney A., Brooks, Antone L., McCord, Stacey, Dagle, Gerald E., James, Anthony C., Tolmachev, Sergei Y., Thrall, Brian D., & Morgan, William F. Microdistribution and Long-Term Retention of 239Pu (NO3)4 in the Respiratory Tracts of an Acutely Exposed Plutonium Worker and Experimental Beagle Dogs. United States. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-12-1824.
Nielsen, Christopher E., Wilson, Dulaney A., Brooks, Antone L., McCord, Stacey, Dagle, Gerald E., James, Anthony C., Tolmachev, Sergei Y., Thrall, Brian D., and Morgan, William F. Thu . "Microdistribution and Long-Term Retention of 239Pu (NO3)4 in the Respiratory Tracts of an Acutely Exposed Plutonium Worker and Experimental Beagle Dogs". United States. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-12-1824.
@article{osti_1057822,
title = {Microdistribution and Long-Term Retention of 239Pu (NO3)4 in the Respiratory Tracts of an Acutely Exposed Plutonium Worker and Experimental Beagle Dogs},
author = {Nielsen, Christopher E. and Wilson, Dulaney A. and Brooks, Antone L. and McCord, Stacey and Dagle, Gerald E. and James, Anthony C. and Tolmachev, Sergei Y. and Thrall, Brian D. and Morgan, William F.},
abstractNote = {The long-term retention of inhaled soluble forms of plutonium raises concerns as to the potential health effects in persons working in nuclear energy or the nuclear weapons program. The distributions of long-term retained inhaled plutonium-nitrate [239Pu (NO3)4] deposited in the lungs of an accidentally exposed nuclear worker (Human Case 0269) and in the lungs of experimentally exposed beagle dogs with varying initial lung depositions were determined via autoradiographs of selected histological lung, lymph node, trachea, and nasal turbinate tissue sections. These studies showed that both the human and dogs had a non-uniform distribution of plutonium throughout the lung tissue. Fibrotic scar tissue effectively encapsulated a portion of the plutonium and prevented its clearance from the body or translocation to other tissues and diminished dose to organ parenchyma. Alpha radiation activity from deposited plutonium in Human Case 0269 was observed primarily along the sub-pleural regions while no alpha activity was seen in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of this individual. However, relatively high activity levels in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of the beagles indicated the lymphatic system was effective in clearing deposited plutonium from the lung tissues. In both the human case and beagle dogs, the appearance of retained plutonium within the respiratory tract was inconsistent with current biokinetic models of clearance for soluble forms of plutonium. Bound plutonium can have a marked effect on the dose to the lungs and subsequent radiation exposure has the potential increase in cancer risk.},
doi = {10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-12-1824},
journal = {Cancer Research, 72(21):5529-5536},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {11}
}