skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Development of an S-Saltcake Simulant Using Crossflow Filtration as a Validation Technique

Abstract

In the past several years, cross-flow filtration has been studied extensively in a bench-scale system at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using both actual tank waste from the Hanford site and waste simulants. One challenge when creating a waste simulant is duplicating the filtration behaviour of real waste, in particular when the waste composition is not known with certainty. Using a systematic approach to filtration testing, it has been found that the solid components that dominate the filtration behaviour can be identified. This approach was used to develop a waste simulant for S-Saltcake tank waste. The analysis of filtration data assists in screening solid components when the chemical composition and structure of a metal is not known. This is well-illustrated in this study during the search for the appropriate chromium phase. After the likely components were identified, the solids were combined with a supernate that is representative of the real waste and the filtration performance was verified against real waste data. A secondary benefit of this approach is the construction of a database of filtration performance for various solid species that can be used to quickly develop waste simulants in the future.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1055400
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-84086
EY7144147
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Separation Science and Technology, 47(14-15):2098-2107
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Separation Science and Technology, 47(14-15):2098-2107
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
waste simulant, crossflow filtration, S-Saltcake

Citation Formats

Schonewill, Philip P., Daniel, Richard C., Russell, Renee L., Shimskey, Rick W., Burns, Carolyn A., Billing, Justin M., Rapko, Brian M., and Peterson, Reid A. Development of an S-Saltcake Simulant Using Crossflow Filtration as a Validation Technique. United States: N. p., 2012. Web.
Schonewill, Philip P., Daniel, Richard C., Russell, Renee L., Shimskey, Rick W., Burns, Carolyn A., Billing, Justin M., Rapko, Brian M., & Peterson, Reid A. Development of an S-Saltcake Simulant Using Crossflow Filtration as a Validation Technique. United States.
Schonewill, Philip P., Daniel, Richard C., Russell, Renee L., Shimskey, Rick W., Burns, Carolyn A., Billing, Justin M., Rapko, Brian M., and Peterson, Reid A. Fri . "Development of an S-Saltcake Simulant Using Crossflow Filtration as a Validation Technique". United States.
@article{osti_1055400,
title = {Development of an S-Saltcake Simulant Using Crossflow Filtration as a Validation Technique},
author = {Schonewill, Philip P. and Daniel, Richard C. and Russell, Renee L. and Shimskey, Rick W. and Burns, Carolyn A. and Billing, Justin M. and Rapko, Brian M. and Peterson, Reid A.},
abstractNote = {In the past several years, cross-flow filtration has been studied extensively in a bench-scale system at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using both actual tank waste from the Hanford site and waste simulants. One challenge when creating a waste simulant is duplicating the filtration behaviour of real waste, in particular when the waste composition is not known with certainty. Using a systematic approach to filtration testing, it has been found that the solid components that dominate the filtration behaviour can be identified. This approach was used to develop a waste simulant for S-Saltcake tank waste. The analysis of filtration data assists in screening solid components when the chemical composition and structure of a metal is not known. This is well-illustrated in this study during the search for the appropriate chromium phase. After the likely components were identified, the solids were combined with a supernate that is representative of the real waste and the filtration performance was verified against real waste data. A secondary benefit of this approach is the construction of a database of filtration performance for various solid species that can be used to quickly develop waste simulants in the future.},
doi = {},
journal = {Separation Science and Technology, 47(14-15):2098-2107},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {11}
}