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Title: Broad Overview of the Status of Biodiesel in the United States

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Vehicle Technologies Program
OSTI Identifier:
1054027
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Stability, Handling and Use of Liquid Fuels 2007, 7-11 October 2007, Tucson, Arizona; Volume 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 02 PETROLEUM; Transportation

Citation Formats

McCormick, R. L., Alleman, T., Barnitt, R., Clark, W., Howell, S., Ireland, J., Knoll, K., Lammert, M., Morton, J., Nanjundaswamy, H., Pedersen, D., Patel, A., Proc, K., Ratcliff, M., Tatur, M., Thornton, M., Tomazic, D., Walkowicz, K., and Westbrook, S. Broad Overview of the Status of Biodiesel in the United States. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
McCormick, R. L., Alleman, T., Barnitt, R., Clark, W., Howell, S., Ireland, J., Knoll, K., Lammert, M., Morton, J., Nanjundaswamy, H., Pedersen, D., Patel, A., Proc, K., Ratcliff, M., Tatur, M., Thornton, M., Tomazic, D., Walkowicz, K., & Westbrook, S. Broad Overview of the Status of Biodiesel in the United States. United States.
McCormick, R. L., Alleman, T., Barnitt, R., Clark, W., Howell, S., Ireland, J., Knoll, K., Lammert, M., Morton, J., Nanjundaswamy, H., Pedersen, D., Patel, A., Proc, K., Ratcliff, M., Tatur, M., Thornton, M., Tomazic, D., Walkowicz, K., and Westbrook, S. Mon . "Broad Overview of the Status of Biodiesel in the United States". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1054027,
title = {Broad Overview of the Status of Biodiesel in the United States},
author = {McCormick, R. L. and Alleman, T. and Barnitt, R. and Clark, W. and Howell, S. and Ireland, J. and Knoll, K. and Lammert, M. and Morton, J. and Nanjundaswamy, H. and Pedersen, D. and Patel, A. and Proc, K. and Ratcliff, M. and Tatur, M. and Thornton, M. and Tomazic, D. and Walkowicz, K. and Westbrook, S.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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