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Title: Biorefinery and Carbon Cycling Research Project

Abstract

In this project we focused on several aspects of technology development that advances the formation of an integrated biorefinery. These focus areas include: [ 1] pretreatment of biomass to enhance quality of products from thermochemical conversion; [2] characterization of and development of coproduct uses; [3] advancement in fermentation of lignocellulosics and particularly C5 and C6 sugars simultaneously, and [ 4] development of algal biomass as a potential substrate for the biorefinery. These advancements are intended to provide a diverse set of product choices within the biorefinery, thus improving the cost effectiveness of the system. Technical effectiveness was demonstrated in the thermochemical product quality in the form of lower tar production, simultaneous of use of multiple sugars in fermentation, use ofbiochar in environmental (ammonia adsorption) and agricultural applications, and production of algal biomass in wastewaters. Economic feasibility of algal biomass production systems seems attractive, relative to the other options. However, further optimization in all paths, and testing/demonstration at larger scales are required to fully understand the economic viabilities. The coproducts provide a clear picture that multiple streams of value can be generated within an integrated biorefinery, and these include fuels and products.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc.
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1053782
Report Number(s):
DOE GO 88144 1
DOE Contract Number:
FG36-08GO88144
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS

Citation Formats

Das, K. C., Adams, Thomas, T, Eiteman, Mark A, Kastner, James R, Mani, Sudhagar, and Adolphson, Ryan. Biorefinery and Carbon Cycling Research Project. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.2172/1053782.
Das, K. C., Adams, Thomas, T, Eiteman, Mark A, Kastner, James R, Mani, Sudhagar, & Adolphson, Ryan. Biorefinery and Carbon Cycling Research Project. United States. doi:10.2172/1053782.
Das, K. C., Adams, Thomas, T, Eiteman, Mark A, Kastner, James R, Mani, Sudhagar, and Adolphson, Ryan. Fri . "Biorefinery and Carbon Cycling Research Project". United States. doi:10.2172/1053782. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1053782.
@article{osti_1053782,
title = {Biorefinery and Carbon Cycling Research Project},
author = {Das, K. C., Adams and Thomas, T and Eiteman, Mark A and Kastner, James R and Mani, Sudhagar and Adolphson, Ryan},
abstractNote = {In this project we focused on several aspects of technology development that advances the formation of an integrated biorefinery. These focus areas include: [ 1] pretreatment of biomass to enhance quality of products from thermochemical conversion; [2] characterization of and development of coproduct uses; [3] advancement in fermentation of lignocellulosics and particularly C5 and C6 sugars simultaneously, and [ 4] development of algal biomass as a potential substrate for the biorefinery. These advancements are intended to provide a diverse set of product choices within the biorefinery, thus improving the cost effectiveness of the system. Technical effectiveness was demonstrated in the thermochemical product quality in the form of lower tar production, simultaneous of use of multiple sugars in fermentation, use ofbiochar in environmental (ammonia adsorption) and agricultural applications, and production of algal biomass in wastewaters. Economic feasibility of algal biomass production systems seems attractive, relative to the other options. However, further optimization in all paths, and testing/demonstration at larger scales are required to fully understand the economic viabilities. The coproducts provide a clear picture that multiple streams of value can be generated within an integrated biorefinery, and these include fuels and products.},
doi = {10.2172/1053782},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 08 00:00:00 EDT 2012},
month = {Fri Jun 08 00:00:00 EDT 2012}
}

Technical Report:

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