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Title: The future of nuclear weapons: Proliferation in South Asia

Abstract

The signing of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty in December 1987, followed by the dramatic changes in East-West relations since 1989 and the more recent Soviet-American strategic arms limitation agreement, have greatly eased public concerns about the danger of nuclear war. The context has also changed for the Nonaligned Movement, which had made nuclear disarmament and condemnation of the concept of nuclear deterrence the primary themes of its multilateral disarmament diplomacy. More important would be the interrelationship among the states possessing nuclear weapons (Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan). In any case, there is little risk of a revival of nuclear competition. Both France and China have decided to sign the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT); they are the only two nuclear-weapon states that have stayed outside the regime. Meanwhile, Brazil and Argentina have moved further down the nonproliferation road by engaging in confidence-building measures and moving closer to joining the Latin American nuclear-weapons-free zone established under the Treaty of Tlatelolco in 1967. South Africa has also agreed to embrace the NPT as well as a nuclear-weapons-free zone regime for the entire African continent, while North Korea has agreed to sign a safeguard agreement with the Internationalmore » Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), thereby allowing in principle international inspection of its nuclear facilities. In the third world regions, the dangers of nuclear proliferation and competitive nuclear buildup are most pronounced in South Asia, a region where a variety of complicating problems exist: acute threat perceptions, historical emity, religious and sectarian animosity, ethnic antagonism, territorial disputes, ambitions for regional dominance, and domestic political instability. This chapter will focus primarily on South Asia, although references will also be made to other regions, where relevant. 17 refs.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Institute of Strategic Studies, Islamabada (Pakistan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
105177
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1992; Related Information: Is Part Of Nuclear weapons in the changing world: Perspectives from Europe, Asia, and North America; Garrity, P.J.; Maaranen, S.A. [eds.]; PB: 302 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
35 ARMS CONTROL; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; PROLIFERATION; ARMS CONTROL; ASIA; NON-PROLIFERATION POLICY; POLITICAL ASPECTS; CHINA; NORTH KOREA; REPUBLIC OF KOREA; INDIA; PAKISTAN

Citation Formats

Kamal, N. The future of nuclear weapons: Proliferation in South Asia. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Kamal, N. The future of nuclear weapons: Proliferation in South Asia. United States.
Kamal, N. Thu . "The future of nuclear weapons: Proliferation in South Asia". United States.
@article{osti_105177,
title = {The future of nuclear weapons: Proliferation in South Asia},
author = {Kamal, N},
abstractNote = {The signing of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty in December 1987, followed by the dramatic changes in East-West relations since 1989 and the more recent Soviet-American strategic arms limitation agreement, have greatly eased public concerns about the danger of nuclear war. The context has also changed for the Nonaligned Movement, which had made nuclear disarmament and condemnation of the concept of nuclear deterrence the primary themes of its multilateral disarmament diplomacy. More important would be the interrelationship among the states possessing nuclear weapons (Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan). In any case, there is little risk of a revival of nuclear competition. Both France and China have decided to sign the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT); they are the only two nuclear-weapon states that have stayed outside the regime. Meanwhile, Brazil and Argentina have moved further down the nonproliferation road by engaging in confidence-building measures and moving closer to joining the Latin American nuclear-weapons-free zone established under the Treaty of Tlatelolco in 1967. South Africa has also agreed to embrace the NPT as well as a nuclear-weapons-free zone regime for the entire African continent, while North Korea has agreed to sign a safeguard agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), thereby allowing in principle international inspection of its nuclear facilities. In the third world regions, the dangers of nuclear proliferation and competitive nuclear buildup are most pronounced in South Asia, a region where a variety of complicating problems exist: acute threat perceptions, historical emity, religious and sectarian animosity, ethnic antagonism, territorial disputes, ambitions for regional dominance, and domestic political instability. This chapter will focus primarily on South Asia, although references will also be made to other regions, where relevant. 17 refs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1992},
month = {12}
}

Book:
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