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Title: Size Dependence of a Temperature-Induced Solid-Solid Phase Transition in Copper(I) Sulfide

Abstract

Determination of the phase diagrams for the nanocrystalline forms of materials is crucial for our understanding of nanostructures and the design of functional materials using nanoscale building blocks. The ability to study such transformations in nanomaterials with controlled shape offers further insight into transition mechanisms and the influence of particular facets. Here we present an investigation of the size-dependent, temperature-induced solid-solid phase transition in copper sulfide nanorods from low- to high-chalcocite. We find the transition temperature to be substantially reduced, with the high chalcocite phase appearing in the smallest nanocrystals at temperatures so low that they are typical of photovoltaic operation. Size dependence in phase trans- formations suggests the possibility of accessing morphologies that are not found in bulk solids at ambient conditions. These other- wise-inaccessible crystal phases could enable higher-performing materials in a range of applications, including sensing, switching, lighting, and photovoltaics.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Materials Sciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
1051268
Report Number(s):
LBNL-5080E
Journal ID: ISSN 1948-7185; TRN: US201218%%1356
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2; Journal Issue: 19; Journal ID: ISSN 1948-7185
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; COPPER SULFIDES; DESIGN; FUNCTIONALS; NANOSTRUCTURES; PHASE DIAGRAMS; SHAPE; SULFIDES; TRANSFORMATIONS; TRANSITION TEMPERATURE; phase transition, low high chalcocite, nanoparticle, copper sulfide

Citation Formats

Rivest, Jessy B, Fong, Lam-Kiu, Jain, Prashant K, Toney, Michael F, and Alivisatos, A Paul. Size Dependence of a Temperature-Induced Solid-Solid Phase Transition in Copper(I) Sulfide. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1021/jz2010144.
Rivest, Jessy B, Fong, Lam-Kiu, Jain, Prashant K, Toney, Michael F, & Alivisatos, A Paul. Size Dependence of a Temperature-Induced Solid-Solid Phase Transition in Copper(I) Sulfide. United States. doi:10.1021/jz2010144.
Rivest, Jessy B, Fong, Lam-Kiu, Jain, Prashant K, Toney, Michael F, and Alivisatos, A Paul. Sun . "Size Dependence of a Temperature-Induced Solid-Solid Phase Transition in Copper(I) Sulfide". United States. doi:10.1021/jz2010144. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1051268.
@article{osti_1051268,
title = {Size Dependence of a Temperature-Induced Solid-Solid Phase Transition in Copper(I) Sulfide},
author = {Rivest, Jessy B and Fong, Lam-Kiu and Jain, Prashant K and Toney, Michael F and Alivisatos, A Paul},
abstractNote = {Determination of the phase diagrams for the nanocrystalline forms of materials is crucial for our understanding of nanostructures and the design of functional materials using nanoscale building blocks. The ability to study such transformations in nanomaterials with controlled shape offers further insight into transition mechanisms and the influence of particular facets. Here we present an investigation of the size-dependent, temperature-induced solid-solid phase transition in copper sulfide nanorods from low- to high-chalcocite. We find the transition temperature to be substantially reduced, with the high chalcocite phase appearing in the smallest nanocrystals at temperatures so low that they are typical of photovoltaic operation. Size dependence in phase trans- formations suggests the possibility of accessing morphologies that are not found in bulk solids at ambient conditions. These other- wise-inaccessible crystal phases could enable higher-performing materials in a range of applications, including sensing, switching, lighting, and photovoltaics.},
doi = {10.1021/jz2010144},
journal = {Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters},
issn = {1948-7185},
number = 19,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {7}
}