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Title: Aerogel nanocomposite materials

Abstract

Aerogels are porous, low density, nanostructured solids with many unusual properties including very low thermal conductivity, good transparency, high surface area, catalytic activity, and low sound velocity. This research is directed toward developing new nanocomposite aerogel materials for improved thermal insulation and several other applications. A major focus of the research has been to further increase the thermal resistance of silica aerogel by introducing infrared opacification agents into the aerogel to produce a superinsulating composite material. Opacified superinsulating aerogel permit a number of industrial applications for aerogel-based insulation. The primary benefits from this recently developed superinsulating composite aerogel insulation are: to extend the range of applications to higher temperatures, to provide a more compact insulation for space sensitive-applications, and to lower costs of aerogel by as much as 30%. Superinsulating aerogels can replace existing CFC-containing polyurethane in low temperature applications to reduce heat losses in piping, improve the thermal efficiency of refrigeration systems, and reduce energy losses in a variety of industrial applications. Enhanced aerogel insulation can also replace steam and process pipe insulation in higher temperature applications to substantially reduce energy losses and provide much more compact insulation.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States); and others
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
105119
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-12963
ON: DE95016129; TRN: 95:006492-0008
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: May 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program. Annual progress report, FY 1994; Sorrell, C.A.; PB: 341 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; GELS; THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY; SILICA; CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION; COMPOSITE MATERIALS; PROGRESS REPORT; THERMAL INSULATION; CARBON; OPACITY; INFRARED RADIATION; RADIANT HEAT TRANSFER

Citation Formats

Hunt, A. J., Ayers, M., and Cao, W. Aerogel nanocomposite materials. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.2172/105119.
Hunt, A. J., Ayers, M., & Cao, W. Aerogel nanocomposite materials. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/105119
Hunt, A. J., Ayers, M., and Cao, W. Mon . "Aerogel nanocomposite materials". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/105119. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/105119.
@article{osti_105119,
title = {Aerogel nanocomposite materials},
author = {Hunt, A. J. and Ayers, M. and Cao, W.},
abstractNote = {Aerogels are porous, low density, nanostructured solids with many unusual properties including very low thermal conductivity, good transparency, high surface area, catalytic activity, and low sound velocity. This research is directed toward developing new nanocomposite aerogel materials for improved thermal insulation and several other applications. A major focus of the research has been to further increase the thermal resistance of silica aerogel by introducing infrared opacification agents into the aerogel to produce a superinsulating composite material. Opacified superinsulating aerogel permit a number of industrial applications for aerogel-based insulation. The primary benefits from this recently developed superinsulating composite aerogel insulation are: to extend the range of applications to higher temperatures, to provide a more compact insulation for space sensitive-applications, and to lower costs of aerogel by as much as 30%. Superinsulating aerogels can replace existing CFC-containing polyurethane in low temperature applications to reduce heat losses in piping, improve the thermal efficiency of refrigeration systems, and reduce energy losses in a variety of industrial applications. Enhanced aerogel insulation can also replace steam and process pipe insulation in higher temperature applications to substantially reduce energy losses and provide much more compact insulation.},
doi = {10.2172/105119},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/105119}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {5}
}