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Title: Accelerating the Licensing Process for To-Be-Developed Technologies

Abstract

For intellectual property and technologies to lead to commercial products injections of technical and commercial ideas, development resources, investment capital and business discipline are needed at determinant points along the way. This holds true if the inventing organization is a public sector laboratory chartered to develop technology for someone else to commercialize for the public good, or is a private sector for-profit company capable of commercializing itself, if it chooses to do so. The path from invention to product has twists, turns, surprises and delays even when one organization keeps control and ownership from beginning to end. When the inventing organization will not be the one to complete the technology development, but instead intends to license and transfer it to an acquiring party as To-Be-Developed Technology for that party to complete and commercialize, then a process discontinuity arises that adds delays and costs to both licensor and licensee unless both parties address the stumbling issues that stand in the way of a better and faster outcome.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1051136
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Les Nouvelles; Journal Volume: 2007; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; BUSINESS; CAPITAL; INVENTIONS; LICENSING; OWNERSHIP; Commercialization and Technology Transfer

Citation Formats

Orphanides, G., Porto, C., Gleitman, D., Formanek, N., and Williams, T. Accelerating the Licensing Process for To-Be-Developed Technologies. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Orphanides, G., Porto, C., Gleitman, D., Formanek, N., & Williams, T. Accelerating the Licensing Process for To-Be-Developed Technologies. United States.
Orphanides, G., Porto, C., Gleitman, D., Formanek, N., and Williams, T. Thu . "Accelerating the Licensing Process for To-Be-Developed Technologies". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1051136,
title = {Accelerating the Licensing Process for To-Be-Developed Technologies},
author = {Orphanides, G. and Porto, C. and Gleitman, D. and Formanek, N. and Williams, T.},
abstractNote = {For intellectual property and technologies to lead to commercial products injections of technical and commercial ideas, development resources, investment capital and business discipline are needed at determinant points along the way. This holds true if the inventing organization is a public sector laboratory chartered to develop technology for someone else to commercialize for the public good, or is a private sector for-profit company capable of commercializing itself, if it chooses to do so. The path from invention to product has twists, turns, surprises and delays even when one organization keeps control and ownership from beginning to end. When the inventing organization will not be the one to complete the technology development, but instead intends to license and transfer it to an acquiring party as To-Be-Developed Technology for that party to complete and commercialize, then a process discontinuity arises that adds delays and costs to both licensor and licensee unless both parties address the stumbling issues that stand in the way of a better and faster outcome.},
doi = {},
journal = {Les Nouvelles},
number = 1,
volume = 2007,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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