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Title: Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations

Abstract

Industrial-scale storage of CO{sub 2} in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO{sub 2} plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards along these conduits and mix with groundwater resources. This paper discusses the potential for such brine leakage to occur in temperature- and salinity-stratified systems. Using static mass-balance calculations as well as dynamic well flow simulations, we evaluate the minimum reservoir pressure that would generate continuous migration of brine up a leaking wellbore into a freshwater aquifer. Since the brine invading the well is denser than the initial fluid in the wellbore, continuous flow only occurs if the pressure perturbation in the reservoir is large enough to overcome the increased fluid column weight after full invasion of brine into the well. If the threshold pressure is exceeded, brine flow rates are dependent on various hydraulic (and other) properties, in particular the effective permeability of the wellbore and the magnitude of pressure increase. If brine flow occurs outside of the well casing, e.g., in a permeable fracture zone between the well cement and the formation, the fluid/solute transfer between themore » migrating fluid and the surrounding rock units can strongly retard brine flow. At the same time, the threshold pressure for continuous flow to occur decreases compared to a case with no fluid/solute transfer.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Earth Sciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
1050709
Report Number(s):
LBNL-4864E
Journal ID: ISSN 1750-5836; TRN: US201218%%910
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 4; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 2011; Journal ID: ISSN 1750-5836
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AQUIFERS; BOREHOLES; BRINES; CARBON SEQUESTRATION; CEMENTS; FLOW RATE; FRACTURES; HYDRAULICS; MASS BALANCE; PERMEABILITY; PLUMES; RESERVOIR PRESSURE; SEDIMENTARY BASINS; STORAGE; WELL CASINGS

Citation Formats

Birkholzer, J T, Nicot, J -P, Oldenburg, C M, Zhou, Q, Kraemer, S, and Bandilla, K W. Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2011.01.003.
Birkholzer, J T, Nicot, J -P, Oldenburg, C M, Zhou, Q, Kraemer, S, & Bandilla, K W. Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations. United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijggc.2011.01.003
Birkholzer, J T, Nicot, J -P, Oldenburg, C M, Zhou, Q, Kraemer, S, and Bandilla, K W. 2011. "Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations". United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijggc.2011.01.003. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1050709.
@article{osti_1050709,
title = {Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations},
author = {Birkholzer, J T and Nicot, J -P and Oldenburg, C M and Zhou, Q and Kraemer, S and Bandilla, K W},
abstractNote = {Industrial-scale storage of CO{sub 2} in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO{sub 2} plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards along these conduits and mix with groundwater resources. This paper discusses the potential for such brine leakage to occur in temperature- and salinity-stratified systems. Using static mass-balance calculations as well as dynamic well flow simulations, we evaluate the minimum reservoir pressure that would generate continuous migration of brine up a leaking wellbore into a freshwater aquifer. Since the brine invading the well is denser than the initial fluid in the wellbore, continuous flow only occurs if the pressure perturbation in the reservoir is large enough to overcome the increased fluid column weight after full invasion of brine into the well. If the threshold pressure is exceeded, brine flow rates are dependent on various hydraulic (and other) properties, in particular the effective permeability of the wellbore and the magnitude of pressure increase. If brine flow occurs outside of the well casing, e.g., in a permeable fracture zone between the well cement and the formation, the fluid/solute transfer between the migrating fluid and the surrounding rock units can strongly retard brine flow. At the same time, the threshold pressure for continuous flow to occur decreases compared to a case with no fluid/solute transfer.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijggc.2011.01.003},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1050709}, journal = {International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control},
issn = {1750-5836},
number = 4,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {5}
}