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Title: Ion effects in future circular and linear accelerators

Abstract

In this paper, the author discusses ion effects relevant to future storage rings and linear colliders. The author first reviews the conventional ion effects observed in present storage rings and then discusses how these effects will differ in the next generation of rings and linacs. These future accelerators operate in a new regime because of the high current long bunch trains and the very small transverse beam emittances. Usually, storage rings are designed with ion clearing gaps to prevent ion trapping between bunch trains or beam revolutions. Regardless, ions generated within a single bunch train can have significant effects. The same is true in transport lines and linacs, where typical vacuum pressures are relatively high. Amongst other effects, the author addresses the tune spreads due to the ions and the resulting filamentation which can severely limit emittance correction techniques in future linear colliders, the bunch-to-bunch coupling due to the ions which can cause a multi-bunch instability with fast growth rates, and the betatron coupling and beam halo creation which limit the vertical emittance and beam lifetimes.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Monsanto Research Corp., Miamisburg, OH (United States). Mound
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
104967
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-95-6847; CONF-950512-313
ON: DE95017723; TRN: 95:020615
DOE Contract Number:
AC03-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 16. Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) particle accelerator conference, Dallas, TX (United States), 1-5 May 1995; Other Information: PBD: May 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; BEAM DYNAMICS; CYCLIC ACCELERATORS; IONS; TRAPPING; BEAM BUNCHING

Citation Formats

Raubenheimer, T.O. Ion effects in future circular and linear accelerators. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Raubenheimer, T.O. Ion effects in future circular and linear accelerators. United States.
Raubenheimer, T.O. Mon . "Ion effects in future circular and linear accelerators". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/104967.
@article{osti_104967,
title = {Ion effects in future circular and linear accelerators},
author = {Raubenheimer, T.O.},
abstractNote = {In this paper, the author discusses ion effects relevant to future storage rings and linear colliders. The author first reviews the conventional ion effects observed in present storage rings and then discusses how these effects will differ in the next generation of rings and linacs. These future accelerators operate in a new regime because of the high current long bunch trains and the very small transverse beam emittances. Usually, storage rings are designed with ion clearing gaps to prevent ion trapping between bunch trains or beam revolutions. Regardless, ions generated within a single bunch train can have significant effects. The same is true in transport lines and linacs, where typical vacuum pressures are relatively high. Amongst other effects, the author addresses the tune spreads due to the ions and the resulting filamentation which can severely limit emittance correction techniques in future linear colliders, the bunch-to-bunch coupling due to the ions which can cause a multi-bunch instability with fast growth rates, and the betatron coupling and beam halo creation which limit the vertical emittance and beam lifetimes.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 1995},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 1995}
}

Conference:
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  • The purpose of both linear and circular accelerator is, of course, to accelerate beams of charged particles. In order to do this it is necessary not only to accelerate particles but also to confine them transversely so that they remain in the vacuum environment. Originally, as accelerators were developed, the intensity of the beams was rather low and so the external fields could be applied without regard to the effects of the space-charge forces of the beams. However, as the demand for high intensity increased, collective effects that are due to the space-charge forces became increasingly important. In order tomore » control a beam of particles we apply external fields. These focus the beam transversely and accelerate it and focus it longitudinally. In addition to these externally applied fields a particle within the beam feels a field due to the charge and current of all the other particles in the beam. By collective effects, we mean all those modifications to the beam behavior which are due to these beam-induced forces. The first two major topics discussed are linear and circular accelerators. In the linear accelerator case, we will consider as examples only electron linacs that have relatively high energy and so particles will have {nu} {approx equal} c. For circular accelerators we'll consider both protons and electrons or their anti-particles. The next two topics are single bunches and multi-bunches. In both linear accelerators and circular accelerators the particles have a bunched character because they are accelerated by an RF system, and the RF has a natural wavelength. The next two topics arise from the natural separation of longitudinal and transverse effects. 40 refs., 30 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • The general characteristics of heavy-ion linacs are summarized, with emphasis on the similarities and differences of systems based on different technologies. The main design considerations of superconducting linacs are outlined, the many projects based on this technology are listed, and a new concept for a superconducting injector linac is described. The role of RFQ structures for heavy-ion acceleration is summarized. A concluding section lists some probable applications of heavy-ion accelerators during the next decade. 17 references, 5 figures, 1 table.
  • No abstract prepared.
  • The ability of existing analytical and numerical tools to predict beam performance at the short bunch lengths and high peak currents characteristic of contemporary accelerator designs is discussed. Recent advances in calculating the high frequency behavior of impedance and in describing bunched-beam collective dynamics are highlighted. A critical review is presented of outstanding problems that must be addressed before a thorough description of short, intense bunches is obtained.