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Title: Ultrasonic Evaluation of Two Dissimilar Metal Weld Overlay Specimens

Abstract

Two dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe-to-nozzle specimens were implanted with thermal fatigue cracks in the 13% to 90% through-wall depth range. The specimens were ultrasonically evaluated with phased-array probes having center frequencies of 0.8, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 megahertz (MHz). An Alloy 82/182 weld overlay (WOL) was applied and the specimens were ultrasonically re-evaluated for flaw detection and characterization. The Post-WOL flaw depths were approximately 10% to 56% through-wall. This study has shown the effectiveness of ultrasonic examinations of Alloy 82/182 overlaid DMW specimens. Phased-array probes with center frequency in the 0.8- to 1.0-MHz range provide a strong coherent signal but the greater ultrasonic wavelength and larger beam spot size prevent the reliable detection of small flaws. These small flaws had nominal through-wall depths of less than 15% and length in the 50-60 mm (2-2.4 in.) range. Flaws in the 19% and greater through-wall depth range were readily detected with all four probes. At the higher frequencies, the reflected signals are less coherent but still provide adequate signal for flaw detection and characterization. A single inspection at 2.0 MHz could provide adequate detection and sizing information but a supplemental inspection at 1.0 or 1.5 MHz is recommended.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1049665
Report Number(s):
PNNL-21502
401001060; TRN: US201218%%584
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALLOYS; DEFECTS; DETECTION; EVALUATION; PROBES; SIZE; THERMAL FATIGUE; ULTRASONIC WAVES; WAVELENGTHS; Ultrasonic Evaluation; Dissimilar Metal Weld; Weld Overlay; Phased Array

Citation Formats

Crawford, Susan L, Cinson, Anthony D, Prowant, Matthew S, Moran, Traci L, and Anderson, Michael T. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Two Dissimilar Metal Weld Overlay Specimens. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.2172/1049665.
Crawford, Susan L, Cinson, Anthony D, Prowant, Matthew S, Moran, Traci L, & Anderson, Michael T. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Two Dissimilar Metal Weld Overlay Specimens. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1049665
Crawford, Susan L, Cinson, Anthony D, Prowant, Matthew S, Moran, Traci L, and Anderson, Michael T. Sat . "Ultrasonic Evaluation of Two Dissimilar Metal Weld Overlay Specimens". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1049665. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1049665.
@article{osti_1049665,
title = {Ultrasonic Evaluation of Two Dissimilar Metal Weld Overlay Specimens},
author = {Crawford, Susan L and Cinson, Anthony D and Prowant, Matthew S and Moran, Traci L and Anderson, Michael T},
abstractNote = {Two dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe-to-nozzle specimens were implanted with thermal fatigue cracks in the 13% to 90% through-wall depth range. The specimens were ultrasonically evaluated with phased-array probes having center frequencies of 0.8, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 megahertz (MHz). An Alloy 82/182 weld overlay (WOL) was applied and the specimens were ultrasonically re-evaluated for flaw detection and characterization. The Post-WOL flaw depths were approximately 10% to 56% through-wall. This study has shown the effectiveness of ultrasonic examinations of Alloy 82/182 overlaid DMW specimens. Phased-array probes with center frequency in the 0.8- to 1.0-MHz range provide a strong coherent signal but the greater ultrasonic wavelength and larger beam spot size prevent the reliable detection of small flaws. These small flaws had nominal through-wall depths of less than 15% and length in the 50-60 mm (2-2.4 in.) range. Flaws in the 19% and greater through-wall depth range were readily detected with all four probes. At the higher frequencies, the reflected signals are less coherent but still provide adequate signal for flaw detection and characterization. A single inspection at 2.0 MHz could provide adequate detection and sizing information but a supplemental inspection at 1.0 or 1.5 MHz is recommended.},
doi = {10.2172/1049665},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1049665}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {6}
}