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Title: Surfactant removal for colloidal nanoparticles from solution systhesis: the effect on catalytic performance

Abstract

Colloidal nanoparticles prepared by solution synthesis with robust control over particle size, shape, composition, and structure have shown great potential for catalytic applications. However, such colloidal nanoparticles are usually capped with organic ligands (as surfactants) and cannot be directly used as catalyst. We have studied the effect of surfactant removal on the electrocatalytic performance of Pt nanoparticles made by organic solution synthesis. Various methods were applied to remove the oleylamine surfactant, which included thermal annealing, acetic acid washing, and UV-Ozone irradiation, and the treated nanoparticles were applied as electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. It was found that the electrocatalytic performance, including electrochemically active surface area and catalytic activity, was strongly dependent on the pretreatment. Among the methods studied here, low-temperature thermal annealing ({approx}185 C) in air was found to be the most effective for surface cleaning without inducing particle size and morphology changes.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. Materials Science Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1049038
Report Number(s):
ANL/MSD/JA-73508
Journal ID: ISSN 2155-5435; TRN: US201217%%304
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
ACS Catalysis
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2155-5435
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ACETIC ACID; AIR; ANNEALING; CATALYSIS; ELECTROCATALYSTS; IRRADIATION; MORPHOLOGY; OXYGEN; PARTICLE SIZE; PERFORMANCE; REMOVAL; SHAPE; SURFACE AREA; SURFACE CLEANING; SURFACTANTS; SYNTHESIS; WASHING

Citation Formats

Li, D, Wang, C, Tripkovic, D, Sun, S, Markovic, N M, Stamenkovic, V R, and Brown Univ.). Surfactant removal for colloidal nanoparticles from solution systhesis: the effect on catalytic performance. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1021/cs300219j.
Li, D, Wang, C, Tripkovic, D, Sun, S, Markovic, N M, Stamenkovic, V R, & Brown Univ.). Surfactant removal for colloidal nanoparticles from solution systhesis: the effect on catalytic performance. United States. https://doi.org/10.1021/cs300219j
Li, D, Wang, C, Tripkovic, D, Sun, S, Markovic, N M, Stamenkovic, V R, and Brown Univ.). 2012. "Surfactant removal for colloidal nanoparticles from solution systhesis: the effect on catalytic performance". United States. https://doi.org/10.1021/cs300219j.
@article{osti_1049038,
title = {Surfactant removal for colloidal nanoparticles from solution systhesis: the effect on catalytic performance},
author = {Li, D and Wang, C and Tripkovic, D and Sun, S and Markovic, N M and Stamenkovic, V R and Brown Univ.)},
abstractNote = {Colloidal nanoparticles prepared by solution synthesis with robust control over particle size, shape, composition, and structure have shown great potential for catalytic applications. However, such colloidal nanoparticles are usually capped with organic ligands (as surfactants) and cannot be directly used as catalyst. We have studied the effect of surfactant removal on the electrocatalytic performance of Pt nanoparticles made by organic solution synthesis. Various methods were applied to remove the oleylamine surfactant, which included thermal annealing, acetic acid washing, and UV-Ozone irradiation, and the treated nanoparticles were applied as electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. It was found that the electrocatalytic performance, including electrochemically active surface area and catalytic activity, was strongly dependent on the pretreatment. Among the methods studied here, low-temperature thermal annealing ({approx}185 C) in air was found to be the most effective for surface cleaning without inducing particle size and morphology changes.},
doi = {10.1021/cs300219j},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1049038}, journal = {ACS Catalysis},
issn = {2155-5435},
number = 7,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {1}
}