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Title: Microbial Lithotrophic Oxidation of Structural Fe(II) in Biotite

Abstract

Microorganisms are known to participate in the weathering of primary phyllosilicate minerals through production of organic ligands and acids, and through uptake of products of weathering. Here we show that a lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture (Straub, 6 1996) can grow via oxidation of structural Fe(II) in biotite, a Fe(II)-rich trioctahedral mica found in granitic rocks. Oxidation of silt/clay sized biotite particles was detected by a decrease in extractable Fe(II) content and simultaneous nitrate reduction. Moessbauer spectroscopy confirmed structural Fe(II) oxidation. Approximately 107 cells were produced per {micro}mol Fe(II) oxidized, in agreement with previous estimates of the growth yield of lithoautotrophic circumneutral-pH Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Microbial oxidation of structural Fe(II) resulted in biotite alterations similar to those found in nature, including decrease in unit cell b-dimension toward dioctahedral levels and iron and potassium release. The demonstration of microbial oxidation of structural Fe(II) suggests that microorganisms may be directly responsible for the initial step in the weathering of biotite in granitic aquifers and the plant rhizosphere.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1049022
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-86996
Journal ID: ISSN 0099-2240; AEMIDF; 35207; KP1704020; TRN: US201217%%293
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 78; Journal Issue: 16; Journal ID: ISSN 0099-2240
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AQUIFERS; BACTERIA; BIOTITE; IRON; MICA; MICROORGANISMS; MOESSBAUER EFFECT; NITRATES; OXIDATION; POTASSIUM; PRODUCTION; WEATHERING; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Shelobolina, Evgenya S., Xu, Huifang, Konishi, Hiromi, Kukkadapu, Ravi K., Wu, Tao, Blothe, Marco, and Roden, Eric E. Microbial Lithotrophic Oxidation of Structural Fe(II) in Biotite. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1128/AEM.01034-12.
Shelobolina, Evgenya S., Xu, Huifang, Konishi, Hiromi, Kukkadapu, Ravi K., Wu, Tao, Blothe, Marco, & Roden, Eric E. Microbial Lithotrophic Oxidation of Structural Fe(II) in Biotite. United States. doi:10.1128/AEM.01034-12.
Shelobolina, Evgenya S., Xu, Huifang, Konishi, Hiromi, Kukkadapu, Ravi K., Wu, Tao, Blothe, Marco, and Roden, Eric E. Fri . "Microbial Lithotrophic Oxidation of Structural Fe(II) in Biotite". United States. doi:10.1128/AEM.01034-12.
@article{osti_1049022,
title = {Microbial Lithotrophic Oxidation of Structural Fe(II) in Biotite},
author = {Shelobolina, Evgenya S. and Xu, Huifang and Konishi, Hiromi and Kukkadapu, Ravi K. and Wu, Tao and Blothe, Marco and Roden, Eric E.},
abstractNote = {Microorganisms are known to participate in the weathering of primary phyllosilicate minerals through production of organic ligands and acids, and through uptake of products of weathering. Here we show that a lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture (Straub, 6 1996) can grow via oxidation of structural Fe(II) in biotite, a Fe(II)-rich trioctahedral mica found in granitic rocks. Oxidation of silt/clay sized biotite particles was detected by a decrease in extractable Fe(II) content and simultaneous nitrate reduction. Moessbauer spectroscopy confirmed structural Fe(II) oxidation. Approximately 107 cells were produced per {micro}mol Fe(II) oxidized, in agreement with previous estimates of the growth yield of lithoautotrophic circumneutral-pH Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Microbial oxidation of structural Fe(II) resulted in biotite alterations similar to those found in nature, including decrease in unit cell b-dimension toward dioctahedral levels and iron and potassium release. The demonstration of microbial oxidation of structural Fe(II) suggests that microorganisms may be directly responsible for the initial step in the weathering of biotite in granitic aquifers and the plant rhizosphere.},
doi = {10.1128/AEM.01034-12},
journal = {Applied and Environmental Microbiology},
issn = {0099-2240},
number = 16,
volume = 78,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {6}
}