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Title: International Nuclear Security

Abstract

This presentation discusses: (1) Definitions of international nuclear security; (2) What degree of security do we have now; (3) Limitations of a nuclear security strategy focused on national lock-downs of fissile materials and weapons; (4) What do current trends say about the future; and (5) How can nuclear security be strengthened? Nuclear security can be strengthened by: (1) More accurate baseline inventories; (2) Better physical protection, control and accounting; (3) Effective personnel reliability programs; (4) Minimize weapons-usable materials and consolidate to fewer locations; (5) Consider local threat environment when siting facilities; (6) Implement pledges made in the NSS process; and (7) More robust interdiction, emergency response and special operations capabilities. International cooperation is desirable, but not always possible.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE/LANL
OSTI Identifier:
1048850
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-12-24089
TRN: US1204317
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: public policy and nuclear threats ; 2012-08-16 - 2012-08-16 ; La Jolla, California, United States
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; FISSILE MATERIALS; INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION; INVENTORIES; PERSONNEL; PHYSICAL PROTECTION; PUBLIC POLICY; RELIABILITY; SECURITY; WEAPONS

Citation Formats

Doyle, James E. International Nuclear Security. United States: N. p., 2012. Web.
Doyle, James E. International Nuclear Security. United States.
Doyle, James E. 2012. "International Nuclear Security". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1048850.
@article{osti_1048850,
title = {International Nuclear Security},
author = {Doyle, James E.},
abstractNote = {This presentation discusses: (1) Definitions of international nuclear security; (2) What degree of security do we have now; (3) Limitations of a nuclear security strategy focused on national lock-downs of fissile materials and weapons; (4) What do current trends say about the future; and (5) How can nuclear security be strengthened? Nuclear security can be strengthened by: (1) More accurate baseline inventories; (2) Better physical protection, control and accounting; (3) Effective personnel reliability programs; (4) Minimize weapons-usable materials and consolidate to fewer locations; (5) Consider local threat environment when siting facilities; (6) Implement pledges made in the NSS process; and (7) More robust interdiction, emergency response and special operations capabilities. International cooperation is desirable, but not always possible.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month = 8
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • No abstract prepared.