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Title: Cornell Fuel Cell Institute: Materials Discovery to Enable Fuel Cell Technologies

Abstract

The discovery and understanding of new, improved materials to advance fuel cell technology are the objectives of the Cornell Fuel Cell Institute (CFCI) research program. CFCI was initially formed in 2003. This report highlights the accomplishments from 2006-2009. Many of the grand challenges in energy science and technology are based on the need for materials with greatly improved or even revolutionary properties and performance. This is certainly true for fuel cells, which have the promise of being highly efficient in the conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy. Fuel cells offer the possibility of efficiencies perhaps up to 90 % based on the free energy of reaction. Here, the challenges are clearly in the materials used to construct the heart of the fuel cell: the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The MEA consists of two electrodes separated by an ionically conducting membrane. Each electrode is a nanocomposite of electronically conducting catalyst support, ionic conductor and open porosity, that together form three percolation networks that must connect to each catalyst nanoparticle; otherwise the catalyst is inactive. This report highlights the findings of the three years completing the CFCI funding, and incudes developments in materials for electrocatalyts, catalyst supports, materials with structured andmore » functional porosity for electrodes, and novel electrolyte membranes. The report also discusses developments at understanding electrocatalytic mechanisms, especially on novel catalyst surfaces, plus in situ characterization techniques and contributions from theory. Much of the research of the CFCI continues within the Energy Materials Center at Cornell (emc2), a DOE funded, Office of Science Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC).« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1048652
Report Number(s):
DOE/03ER46072-3
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-03ER46072
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; 08 HYDROGEN; fuel cell, electrocatalysts, electrolyte, membrane, oxides, ordered intermetallics, platinum, hydrogen

Citation Formats

Abruna, H.D., and DiSalvo, Francis J. Cornell Fuel Cell Institute: Materials Discovery to Enable Fuel Cell Technologies. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.2172/1048652.
Abruna, H.D., & DiSalvo, Francis J. Cornell Fuel Cell Institute: Materials Discovery to Enable Fuel Cell Technologies. United States. doi:10.2172/1048652.
Abruna, H.D., and DiSalvo, Francis J. Fri . "Cornell Fuel Cell Institute: Materials Discovery to Enable Fuel Cell Technologies". United States. doi:10.2172/1048652. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1048652.
@article{osti_1048652,
title = {Cornell Fuel Cell Institute: Materials Discovery to Enable Fuel Cell Technologies},
author = {Abruna, H.D. and DiSalvo, Francis J.},
abstractNote = {The discovery and understanding of new, improved materials to advance fuel cell technology are the objectives of the Cornell Fuel Cell Institute (CFCI) research program. CFCI was initially formed in 2003. This report highlights the accomplishments from 2006-2009. Many of the grand challenges in energy science and technology are based on the need for materials with greatly improved or even revolutionary properties and performance. This is certainly true for fuel cells, which have the promise of being highly efficient in the conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy. Fuel cells offer the possibility of efficiencies perhaps up to 90 % based on the free energy of reaction. Here, the challenges are clearly in the materials used to construct the heart of the fuel cell: the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The MEA consists of two electrodes separated by an ionically conducting membrane. Each electrode is a nanocomposite of electronically conducting catalyst support, ionic conductor and open porosity, that together form three percolation networks that must connect to each catalyst nanoparticle; otherwise the catalyst is inactive. This report highlights the findings of the three years completing the CFCI funding, and incudes developments in materials for electrocatalyts, catalyst supports, materials with structured and functional porosity for electrodes, and novel electrolyte membranes. The report also discusses developments at understanding electrocatalytic mechanisms, especially on novel catalyst surfaces, plus in situ characterization techniques and contributions from theory. Much of the research of the CFCI continues within the Energy Materials Center at Cornell (emc2), a DOE funded, Office of Science Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC).},
doi = {10.2172/1048652},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {6}
}