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Title: Proliferation Resistance and the Nuclear Renaissance

Abstract

This article explores how emphasizing proliferation resistance will accomplish that goal. What does it mean for a nuclear fuel cycle to be resistant to proliferation? How can the risk of proliferation from a fuel cycle be evaluated? How has proliferation been considered in the past and how is it being considered in nuclear energy development programs today? How should proliferation concerns interact with facility safety and operations? How do proliferation concerns affect the prospects for nuclear energy in the 21st century? And finally, what is the thinking today in relation to deployment arrangements, technical measures, and R&D programs that are in place or proposed that could both decrease the risk of proliferation and ensure the successful renaissance of nuclear power.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1048620
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-49806
Journal ID: ISSN 0954-7118; IJGIE7; NN4009010; TRN: US1204236
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Global Energy Issues; Journal Volume: 30; Journal Issue: 1-4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; FUEL CYCLE; NUCLEAR ENERGY; NUCLEAR FUELS; NUCLEAR POWER; PROLIFERATION; SAFETY; Nuclear Materials, proliferation, renaissance

Citation Formats

Shea, Thomas E., and Zentner, Michael D. Proliferation Resistance and the Nuclear Renaissance. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.1504/IJGEI.2008.019872.
Shea, Thomas E., & Zentner, Michael D. Proliferation Resistance and the Nuclear Renaissance. United States. doi:10.1504/IJGEI.2008.019872.
Shea, Thomas E., and Zentner, Michael D. 2008. "Proliferation Resistance and the Nuclear Renaissance". United States. doi:10.1504/IJGEI.2008.019872.
@article{osti_1048620,
title = {Proliferation Resistance and the Nuclear Renaissance},
author = {Shea, Thomas E. and Zentner, Michael D.},
abstractNote = {This article explores how emphasizing proliferation resistance will accomplish that goal. What does it mean for a nuclear fuel cycle to be resistant to proliferation? How can the risk of proliferation from a fuel cycle be evaluated? How has proliferation been considered in the past and how is it being considered in nuclear energy development programs today? How should proliferation concerns interact with facility safety and operations? How do proliferation concerns affect the prospects for nuclear energy in the 21st century? And finally, what is the thinking today in relation to deployment arrangements, technical measures, and R&D programs that are in place or proposed that could both decrease the risk of proliferation and ensure the successful renaissance of nuclear power.},
doi = {10.1504/IJGEI.2008.019872},
journal = {International Journal of Global Energy Issues},
number = 1-4,
volume = 30,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 5
}
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