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Title: Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

Abstract

A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to thismore » point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the waste form.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1047995
Report Number(s):
PNNL-21471
AF5805000; TRN: US1204119
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; BOROSILICATE GLASS; CERAMICS; CONTAINERS; CRUCIBLES; CRYSTALLIZATION; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; GLASS; INDUCTION; MIXTURES; NUCLEAR FUELS; PROCESSING; RARE EARTHS; REPROCESSING; SOLUBILITY; TESTING; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; VISCOSITY; WASTE FORMS; WASTES; glass ceramic, waste form

Citation Formats

Crum, Jarrod V., Rodriguez, Carmen P., McCloy, John S., Vienna, John D., and Chung, Chul-Woo. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.2172/1047995.
Crum, Jarrod V., Rodriguez, Carmen P., McCloy, John S., Vienna, John D., & Chung, Chul-Woo. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package. United States. doi:10.2172/1047995.
Crum, Jarrod V., Rodriguez, Carmen P., McCloy, John S., Vienna, John D., and Chung, Chul-Woo. Sun . "Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package". United States. doi:10.2172/1047995. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1047995.
@article{osti_1047995,
title = {Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package},
author = {Crum, Jarrod V. and Rodriguez, Carmen P. and McCloy, John S. and Vienna, John D. and Chung, Chul-Woo},
abstractNote = {A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the waste form.},
doi = {10.2172/1047995},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jun 17 00:00:00 EDT 2012},
month = {Sun Jun 17 00:00:00 EDT 2012}
}

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