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Title: Enabling Nanoparticle Networking in Semicrystalline Polymer Matrices

Abstract

Among the physical and chemical attributes of the nanocomposite components and their interactions that contribute to the ultimate material properties, nanoparticle arrangement in the matrix is a key contributing factor that has been targeted through materials choices and processing strategies in numerous previous studies. Often, the desired nanocomposite morphology contains individually dispersed and distributed nanoparticles. In this research, a phase-segregated morphology containing nanoparticle networks was studied. A model nanocomposite system composed of calcium phosphate nanoparticles and a poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) matrix was produced to understand how polymer crystallization and crystal structure can facilitate the formation of a phase-segregated morphology containing nanoparticle networks. Two chemically similar calcium phosphate nanoparticle systems with different shapes, near-spherical and nanofiber, were synthesized for use in the nanocomposites. The different shapes were used independently in nanocomposites in an attempt to understand the effect of the nanoparticle shapes on crystallization-mediated nanoparticle network formation. The resulting nanocomposites were characterized to establish the effects of component interactions on the polymer structure. Additionally from the viscoelastic properties, structure-property relationships in these materials can be defined as a function of nanoparticle shape and concentration. The results of this research suggest that when the nanocomposite components are not strongly interacting, polymer crystallization may bemore » used as a forced assembly method for nanoparticle networks. Such a methodology has applications to the design of functional polymer nanocomposites such as biomedical implant materials and organic photovoltaic materials where judicious choice of nanoparticle-polymer pairs and control of polymer crystal nucleation and growth processes could be used to control the length scale of phase segregation.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. (GIT)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
NSFINDUSTRY
OSTI Identifier:
1047916
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: (6) ; 06, 2012; Journal ID: ISSN 1944-8244
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; CALCIUM PHOSPHATES; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; CRYSTALLIZATION; DESIGN; FUNCTIONALS; MATRICES; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; MORPHOLOGY; NUCLEATION; POLYMERS; PROCESSING; SEGREGATION; SHAPE

Citation Formats

Kaur, Jasmeet, Lee, Ji Hoon, Bucknall, David G., and Shofner, Meisha L. Enabling Nanoparticle Networking in Semicrystalline Polymer Matrices. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1021/am300457y.
Kaur, Jasmeet, Lee, Ji Hoon, Bucknall, David G., & Shofner, Meisha L. Enabling Nanoparticle Networking in Semicrystalline Polymer Matrices. United States. doi:10.1021/am300457y.
Kaur, Jasmeet, Lee, Ji Hoon, Bucknall, David G., and Shofner, Meisha L. Tue . "Enabling Nanoparticle Networking in Semicrystalline Polymer Matrices". United States. doi:10.1021/am300457y.
@article{osti_1047916,
title = {Enabling Nanoparticle Networking in Semicrystalline Polymer Matrices},
author = {Kaur, Jasmeet and Lee, Ji Hoon and Bucknall, David G. and Shofner, Meisha L.},
abstractNote = {Among the physical and chemical attributes of the nanocomposite components and their interactions that contribute to the ultimate material properties, nanoparticle arrangement in the matrix is a key contributing factor that has been targeted through materials choices and processing strategies in numerous previous studies. Often, the desired nanocomposite morphology contains individually dispersed and distributed nanoparticles. In this research, a phase-segregated morphology containing nanoparticle networks was studied. A model nanocomposite system composed of calcium phosphate nanoparticles and a poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) matrix was produced to understand how polymer crystallization and crystal structure can facilitate the formation of a phase-segregated morphology containing nanoparticle networks. Two chemically similar calcium phosphate nanoparticle systems with different shapes, near-spherical and nanofiber, were synthesized for use in the nanocomposites. The different shapes were used independently in nanocomposites in an attempt to understand the effect of the nanoparticle shapes on crystallization-mediated nanoparticle network formation. The resulting nanocomposites were characterized to establish the effects of component interactions on the polymer structure. Additionally from the viscoelastic properties, structure-property relationships in these materials can be defined as a function of nanoparticle shape and concentration. The results of this research suggest that when the nanocomposite components are not strongly interacting, polymer crystallization may be used as a forced assembly method for nanoparticle networks. Such a methodology has applications to the design of functional polymer nanocomposites such as biomedical implant materials and organic photovoltaic materials where judicious choice of nanoparticle-polymer pairs and control of polymer crystal nucleation and growth processes could be used to control the length scale of phase segregation.},
doi = {10.1021/am300457y},
journal = {ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces},
issn = {1944-8244},
number = (6) ; 06, 2012,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {10}
}