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Title: Tappable Pine Trees: Commercial Production of Terpene Biofuels in Pine

Abstract

PETRO Project: The University of Florida is working to increase the amount of turpentine in harvested pine from 4% to 20% of its dry weight. While enhanced feedstocks for biofuels have generally focused on fuel production from leafy plants and grasses, the University of Florida is experimenting with enhancing fuel production in a species of pine that is currently used in the paper pulping industry. Pine trees naturally produce around 3-5% terpene content in the wood—terpenes are the energy-dense fuel molecules that are the predominant components of turpentine. The team aims to increase the terpene storage potential and production capacity while improving the terpene composition to a point at which the trees could be tapped while alive, like sugar maples. Growth and production from these trees will take years, but this pioneering technology could have significant impact in making available an economical and domestic source of aviation and diesel biofuels.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Florida
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E)
OSTI Identifier:
1046754
Resource Type:
Program Document
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Plants Engineered to Replace Oil; Advanced Fuels; PETRO; ARPA-E

Citation Formats

None. Tappable Pine Trees: Commercial Production of Terpene Biofuels in Pine. United States: N. p., 2012. Web.
None. Tappable Pine Trees: Commercial Production of Terpene Biofuels in Pine. United States.
None. Sun . "Tappable Pine Trees: Commercial Production of Terpene Biofuels in Pine". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1046754.
@article{osti_1046754,
title = {Tappable Pine Trees: Commercial Production of Terpene Biofuels in Pine},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {PETRO Project: The University of Florida is working to increase the amount of turpentine in harvested pine from 4% to 20% of its dry weight. While enhanced feedstocks for biofuels have generally focused on fuel production from leafy plants and grasses, the University of Florida is experimenting with enhancing fuel production in a species of pine that is currently used in the paper pulping industry. Pine trees naturally produce around 3-5% terpene content in the wood—terpenes are the energy-dense fuel molecules that are the predominant components of turpentine. The team aims to increase the terpene storage potential and production capacity while improving the terpene composition to a point at which the trees could be tapped while alive, like sugar maples. Growth and production from these trees will take years, but this pioneering technology could have significant impact in making available an economical and domestic source of aviation and diesel biofuels.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2012},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2012}
}

Program Document:
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