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Title: Project: Modeling Relativistic Electrons from Nuclear Explosions in the Magnetosphere

Abstract

We present a summary of the FY12 activities for DTRA-funded project 'Modeling Relativistic Electrons from Nuclear Explosions in the Magnetosphere'. We briefly review the outstanding scientific questions and discuss the work done in the last year to try to answer these questions. We then discuss the agenda for this Technical Meeting with the DTRA sponsors. In the last year, we have continued our efforts to understand artificial radiation belts from several different perspectives: (1) Continued development of Electron Source Model (ESM) and comparison to HANE test data; (2) Continued studies of relativistic electron scattering by waves in the natural radiation belts; (3) Began study of self-generated waves from the HANE electrons; and (4) Began modeling for the UCLA laser experiment.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOD
OSTI Identifier:
1046534
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-12-23085
TRN: US201215%%653
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; 79 ASTROPHYSICS, COSMOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY; ARTIFICIAL RADIATION BELTS; ELECTRON SOURCES; ELECTRONS; LASERS; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS; RADIATION BELTS; SCATTERING; SIMULATION; UCLA

Citation Formats

Cowee, Misa, Gary, S. Peter, Winske, Dan, and Liu, Kaijun. Project: Modeling Relativistic Electrons from Nuclear Explosions in the Magnetosphere. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.2172/1046534.
Cowee, Misa, Gary, S. Peter, Winske, Dan, & Liu, Kaijun. Project: Modeling Relativistic Electrons from Nuclear Explosions in the Magnetosphere. United States. doi:10.2172/1046534.
Cowee, Misa, Gary, S. Peter, Winske, Dan, and Liu, Kaijun. 2012. "Project: Modeling Relativistic Electrons from Nuclear Explosions in the Magnetosphere". United States. doi:10.2172/1046534. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1046534.
@article{osti_1046534,
title = {Project: Modeling Relativistic Electrons from Nuclear Explosions in the Magnetosphere},
author = {Cowee, Misa and Gary, S. Peter and Winske, Dan and Liu, Kaijun},
abstractNote = {We present a summary of the FY12 activities for DTRA-funded project 'Modeling Relativistic Electrons from Nuclear Explosions in the Magnetosphere'. We briefly review the outstanding scientific questions and discuss the work done in the last year to try to answer these questions. We then discuss the agenda for this Technical Meeting with the DTRA sponsors. In the last year, we have continued our efforts to understand artificial radiation belts from several different perspectives: (1) Continued development of Electron Source Model (ESM) and comparison to HANE test data; (2) Continued studies of relativistic electron scattering by waves in the natural radiation belts; (3) Began study of self-generated waves from the HANE electrons; and (4) Began modeling for the UCLA laser experiment.},
doi = {10.2172/1046534},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2012,
month = 7
}

Technical Report:

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