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Title: The role of trace gas flux networks in biogeosciences

Abstract

Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe, providing continuous measurements of an array of atmospheric state variables such as temperature, humidity, rainfall, and the concentration of carbon dioxide [New etal., 1999; Tans etal., 1996]. These measurements provide input to weather and climate models and are key to detecting trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. Yet to understand how and why these atmospheric state variables vary in time and space, biogeoscientists need to know where, when, and at what rates important gases are flowing between the land and the atmosphere. Tracking trace gas fluxes provides information on plant or microbial metabolism and climate-ecosystem interactions. The existence of trace gas flux networks is a relatively new phenomenon, dating back to research in 1984. The first gas flux measurement networks were regional in scope and were designed to track pollutant gases such as sulfur dioxide, ozone, nitric acid, and nitrogen dioxide. Atmospheric observations and model simulations were used to infer the depositional rates of these hazardous chemicals [Fowler etal., 2009; Meyers etal., 1991]. In the late 1990s, two additional trace gas flux measurement networks emerged. One, the United States Trace Gas Network (TRAGNET), was a short-lived effort that measured tracemore » gas emissions from the soil and plants with chambers distributed throughout the country [Ojima etal., 2000]. The other, FLUXNET, was an international endeavor that brought many regional networks together to measure the fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sensible heat exchange with the eddy covariance technique [Baldocchi etal., 2001]. FLUXNET, which remains active today, currently includes more than 400 tower sites, dispersed across most of the world's climatic zones and biomes, with sites in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia. More recently, several specialized networks have emerged, including networks dedicated to urban areas (Urban Fluxnet), nitrogen compounds in Europe (NitroEurope), and methane (MethaneNet). Technical Aspects of Flux Networks Eddy covariance flux measurements are the preferred method by which biogeoscientists measure trace gas exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere [Baldocchi, 2003].« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry. Jena (Germany)
  3. Univ. of Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy)
  4. Ensenada Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education. (CICESE), Ensenada (Mexico)
  5. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  6. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Work for Others (WFO)
OSTI Identifier:
1045860
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
EOS Transactions, American Geophysical Union
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 93; Journal Issue: 23
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AFRICA; AIR-BIOSPHERE INTERACTIONS; AIR POLLUTION; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; ASIA; AUSTRALIA; CARBON DIOXIDE; CLIMATE MODELS; DATA COVARIANCES; EUROPE; GASES; GREENHOUSE GASES; MEASURING METHODS; NITRIC ACID; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; NITROGEN DIOXIDE; NORTH AMERICA; OZONE; SOUTH AMERICA; SULFUR DIOXIDE; URBAN AREAS; WATER VAPOR

Citation Formats

Baldocch, Dennis, Reichstein, Markus, Papale, D., Koteen, Laurie, Vargas, Rodrigo, Agarwal, D. A., and Cook, Robert B. The role of trace gas flux networks in biogeosciences. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1029/2012EO230001.
Baldocch, Dennis, Reichstein, Markus, Papale, D., Koteen, Laurie, Vargas, Rodrigo, Agarwal, D. A., & Cook, Robert B. The role of trace gas flux networks in biogeosciences. United States. doi:10.1029/2012EO230001.
Baldocch, Dennis, Reichstein, Markus, Papale, D., Koteen, Laurie, Vargas, Rodrigo, Agarwal, D. A., and Cook, Robert B. Sun . "The role of trace gas flux networks in biogeosciences". United States. doi:10.1029/2012EO230001.
@article{osti_1045860,
title = {The role of trace gas flux networks in biogeosciences},
author = {Baldocch, Dennis and Reichstein, Markus and Papale, D. and Koteen, Laurie and Vargas, Rodrigo and Agarwal, D. A. and Cook, Robert B.},
abstractNote = {Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe, providing continuous measurements of an array of atmospheric state variables such as temperature, humidity, rainfall, and the concentration of carbon dioxide [New etal., 1999; Tans etal., 1996]. These measurements provide input to weather and climate models and are key to detecting trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. Yet to understand how and why these atmospheric state variables vary in time and space, biogeoscientists need to know where, when, and at what rates important gases are flowing between the land and the atmosphere. Tracking trace gas fluxes provides information on plant or microbial metabolism and climate-ecosystem interactions. The existence of trace gas flux networks is a relatively new phenomenon, dating back to research in 1984. The first gas flux measurement networks were regional in scope and were designed to track pollutant gases such as sulfur dioxide, ozone, nitric acid, and nitrogen dioxide. Atmospheric observations and model simulations were used to infer the depositional rates of these hazardous chemicals [Fowler etal., 2009; Meyers etal., 1991]. In the late 1990s, two additional trace gas flux measurement networks emerged. One, the United States Trace Gas Network (TRAGNET), was a short-lived effort that measured trace gas emissions from the soil and plants with chambers distributed throughout the country [Ojima etal., 2000]. The other, FLUXNET, was an international endeavor that brought many regional networks together to measure the fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sensible heat exchange with the eddy covariance technique [Baldocchi etal., 2001]. FLUXNET, which remains active today, currently includes more than 400 tower sites, dispersed across most of the world's climatic zones and biomes, with sites in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia. More recently, several specialized networks have emerged, including networks dedicated to urban areas (Urban Fluxnet), nitrogen compounds in Europe (NitroEurope), and methane (MethaneNet). Technical Aspects of Flux Networks Eddy covariance flux measurements are the preferred method by which biogeoscientists measure trace gas exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere [Baldocchi, 2003].},
doi = {10.1029/2012EO230001},
journal = {EOS Transactions, American Geophysical Union},
number = 23,
volume = 93,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {1}
}