skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: The nuclear energy-nonproliferation link and what the IAEA can do now.

Abstract

Projections of the World Bank indicate that world energy demand is increasing and may more than double by 2050. Several political leaders have recognised the importance of nuclear energy to meet growing energy needs. Indeed, availability of a secure, economically viable energy source is a major factor in the developing world's progress. This expansion, with the potential spread of sensitive material and technology that could be used to develop nuclear weapons, reinforces the need for a comprehensive strategy to counter or mitigate the proliferation risks. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is qualified to lead in developing and promoting a systems approach to enrich and integrate the wide range of national and international efforts required to manage this risk. This paper addresses specific actions that the IAEA, with other bilateral and multilateral efforts, could undertake to facilitate the expansion of nuclear energy while managing security risks.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1044987
Report Number(s):
SAND2006-0040J
TRN: US201214%%864
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proposed for publication in Atoms for Peace.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; AVAILABILITY; ENERGY DEMAND; ENERGY SOURCES; IAEA; NUCLEAR ENERGY; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; PROLIFERATION; SECURITY; SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Citation Formats

Duggan, Ruth Ann, Sellers, Tommy Alvin, and Ellis, Doris E. The nuclear energy-nonproliferation link and what the IAEA can do now.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Duggan, Ruth Ann, Sellers, Tommy Alvin, & Ellis, Doris E. The nuclear energy-nonproliferation link and what the IAEA can do now.. United States.
Duggan, Ruth Ann, Sellers, Tommy Alvin, and Ellis, Doris E. Sun . "The nuclear energy-nonproliferation link and what the IAEA can do now.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1044987,
title = {The nuclear energy-nonproliferation link and what the IAEA can do now.},
author = {Duggan, Ruth Ann and Sellers, Tommy Alvin and Ellis, Doris E.},
abstractNote = {Projections of the World Bank indicate that world energy demand is increasing and may more than double by 2050. Several political leaders have recognised the importance of nuclear energy to meet growing energy needs. Indeed, availability of a secure, economically viable energy source is a major factor in the developing world's progress. This expansion, with the potential spread of sensitive material and technology that could be used to develop nuclear weapons, reinforces the need for a comprehensive strategy to counter or mitigate the proliferation risks. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is qualified to lead in developing and promoting a systems approach to enrich and integrate the wide range of national and international efforts required to manage this risk. This paper addresses specific actions that the IAEA, with other bilateral and multilateral efforts, could undertake to facilitate the expansion of nuclear energy while managing security risks.},
doi = {},
journal = {Proposed for publication in Atoms for Peace.},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Industrial engineering analysis involves two separate tasks: the development of a comprehensive information base on all aspects of the operation, and the application of available tools to help interpret data. The paper describes this for underground mining.
  • The intersection of technology and economics is where all the Smart Grid benefits arise. If we do one without the other, then utilities and consumers hardly see any enduring benefit at all and the investment made in the underlying infrastructure justified on the basis of those benefits is wasted. (author)
  • Although the federal government is responsible for and controls the nuclear power industry, provisions for the safe transport, storage, and disposal of radioactive wastes have been initiated largely at the state and local levels. Numerous state governments have enacted laws explicitly providing state regulatory control over radioactive waste disposal facilities within their borders. However, it is shown that many of these laws are pre-empted by federal statutes or are encroachments upon congressional power invalidated by operation of the supremacy clause of the Constitution.