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Title: Reward, dopamine and the control of food intake: implications for obesity

Abstract

The ability to resist the urge to eat requires the proper functioning of neuronal circuits involved in top-down control to oppose the conditioned responses that predict reward from eating the food and the desire to eat the food. Imaging studies show that obese subjects might have impairments in dopaminergic pathways that regulate neuronal systems associated with reward sensitivity, conditioning and control. It is known that the neuropeptides that regulate energy balance (homeostatic processes) through the hypothalamus also modulate the activity of dopamine cells and their projections into regions involved in the rewarding processes underlying food intake. It is postulated that this could also be a mechanism by which overeating and the resultant resistance to homoeostatic signals impairs the function of circuits involved in reward sensitivity, conditioning and cognitive control.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY (BNL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE SC OFFICE OF SCIENCE (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1043996
Report Number(s):
BNL-97092-2012-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 1364-6613; R&D Project: MO-085; KP1602010; TRN: US1203310
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Trends In Cognitive Sciences
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 15; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1364-6613
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; DOPAMINE; ENERGY BALANCE; FOOD; HYPOTHALAMUS; METABOLIC DISEASES; SENSITIVITY; Obesity; Food intake; reward sensitivity; hypothalamus; hippocampus; dopamine; body mass index (BMI)

Citation Formats

Volkow N. D., Wang G., Volkow, N.D., Wang, G.-J., and Baler, R.D. Reward, dopamine and the control of food intake: implications for obesity. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1016/j.tics.2010.11.001.
Volkow N. D., Wang G., Volkow, N.D., Wang, G.-J., & Baler, R.D. Reward, dopamine and the control of food intake: implications for obesity. United States. doi:10.1016/j.tics.2010.11.001.
Volkow N. D., Wang G., Volkow, N.D., Wang, G.-J., and Baler, R.D. Sat . "Reward, dopamine and the control of food intake: implications for obesity". United States. doi:10.1016/j.tics.2010.11.001.
@article{osti_1043996,
title = {Reward, dopamine and the control of food intake: implications for obesity},
author = {Volkow N. D. and Wang G. and Volkow, N.D. and Wang, G.-J. and Baler, R.D.},
abstractNote = {The ability to resist the urge to eat requires the proper functioning of neuronal circuits involved in top-down control to oppose the conditioned responses that predict reward from eating the food and the desire to eat the food. Imaging studies show that obese subjects might have impairments in dopaminergic pathways that regulate neuronal systems associated with reward sensitivity, conditioning and control. It is known that the neuropeptides that regulate energy balance (homeostatic processes) through the hypothalamus also modulate the activity of dopamine cells and their projections into regions involved in the rewarding processes underlying food intake. It is postulated that this could also be a mechanism by which overeating and the resultant resistance to homoeostatic signals impairs the function of circuits involved in reward sensitivity, conditioning and cognitive control.},
doi = {10.1016/j.tics.2010.11.001},
journal = {Trends In Cognitive Sciences},
issn = {1364-6613},
number = 1,
volume = 15,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {10}
}