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Title: Component Framework for Coupled Integrated Fusion Plasma Simulation

Abstract

Fusion Successful simulation of the complex physics that affect magnetically confined fusion plasma remains an important target milestone towards the development of viable fusion energy. Major advances in the underlying physics formulations, mathematical modeling, and computational tools and techniques are needed to enable a complete fusion simulation on the emerging class of large scale capability parallel computers that are coming on-line in the next few years. Several pilot projects are currently being undertaken to explore different (partial) code integration and coupling problems, and possible solutions that may guide the larger integration endeavor. In this paper, we present the design and implementation details of one such project, a component based approach to couple existing codes to model the interaction between high power radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic waves, and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) aspects of the burning plasma. The framework and component design utilize a light coupling approach based on high level view of constituent codes that facilitates rapid incorporation of new components into the integrated simulation framework. The work illustrates the viability of the light coupling approach to better understand physics and stand-alone computer code dependencies and interactions, as a precursor to a more tightly coupled integrated simulation environment.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1043918
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: HPC-GECO/CompFrame 2007. and Scientific Computing, Montreal, Canada, 20071021, 20071021
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; COMPUTER CODES; COMPUTERS; DESIGN; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; IMPLEMENTATION; MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS; PHYSICS; PLASMA; PLASMA SIMULATION; PRECURSOR; SIMULATION; TARGETS; THERMONUCLEAR REACTORS; VIABILITY

Citation Formats

Elwasif, Wael R, Bernholdt, David E, Berry, Lee A, and Batchelor, Donald B. Component Framework for Coupled Integrated Fusion Plasma Simulation. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Elwasif, Wael R, Bernholdt, David E, Berry, Lee A, & Batchelor, Donald B. Component Framework for Coupled Integrated Fusion Plasma Simulation. United States.
Elwasif, Wael R, Bernholdt, David E, Berry, Lee A, and Batchelor, Donald B. Mon . "Component Framework for Coupled Integrated Fusion Plasma Simulation". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1043918,
title = {Component Framework for Coupled Integrated Fusion Plasma Simulation},
author = {Elwasif, Wael R and Bernholdt, David E and Berry, Lee A and Batchelor, Donald B},
abstractNote = {Fusion Successful simulation of the complex physics that affect magnetically confined fusion plasma remains an important target milestone towards the development of viable fusion energy. Major advances in the underlying physics formulations, mathematical modeling, and computational tools and techniques are needed to enable a complete fusion simulation on the emerging class of large scale capability parallel computers that are coming on-line in the next few years. Several pilot projects are currently being undertaken to explore different (partial) code integration and coupling problems, and possible solutions that may guide the larger integration endeavor. In this paper, we present the design and implementation details of one such project, a component based approach to couple existing codes to model the interaction between high power radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic waves, and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) aspects of the burning plasma. The framework and component design utilize a light coupling approach based on high level view of constituent codes that facilitates rapid incorporation of new components into the integrated simulation framework. The work illustrates the viability of the light coupling approach to better understand physics and stand-alone computer code dependencies and interactions, as a precursor to a more tightly coupled integrated simulation environment.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • The purpose of the Fusion Simulation Project is to develop a predictive capability for integrated modeling of magnetically confined burning plasmas. In support of this mission, the Center for Plasma Edge Simulation has developed an End-to-end Framework for Fusion Integrated Simulation (EFFIS) that combines critical computer science technologies in an effective manner to support leadership class computing and the coupling of complex plasma physics models. We describe here the main components of EFFIS and how they are being utilized to address our goal of integrated predictive plasma edge simulation.
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