skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Methods for Assessing the Impact of Fog Oil Smoke on Availability, Palatability, & Food Quality of Relevant Life Stages of Insects for Threatened and Endangered Species

Abstract

A methodology for quantifying population dynamics and food source value of insect fauna in areas subjected to fog oil smoke was developed. Our approach employed an environmentally controlled re-circulating wind tunnel outfitted with a high-heat vaporization and re-condensation fog oil generator that has been shown to produce aerosols of comparable chemistry and droplet-size distribution as those of field releases of the smoke. This method provides reproducible exposures of insects under realistic climatic and environmental conditions to fog oil aerosols that duplicate chemical and droplet-size characteristics of field releases of the smoke. The responses measured take into account reduction in food sources due to death and to changes in availability of relevant life stages of insects that form the prey base for the listed Threatened and Endangered Species. The influence of key environmental factors, wind speed and canopy structure on these responses were characterized. Data generated using this method was used to develop response functions related to particle size, concentration, wind speed, and canopy structure that will allow military personnel to assess and manage impacts to endangered species from fog oil smoke used in military training.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1043145
Report Number(s):
PNNL-16534
400403209; TRN: US201213%%260
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AEROSOLS; AVAILABILITY; CHEMISTRY; DISTRIBUTION; ENDANGERED SPECIES; EVAPORATION; FOG; FOOD; INSECTS; MILITARY PERSONNEL; PARTICLE SIZE; POPULATION DYNAMICS; RESPONSE FUNCTIONS; TRAINING; VELOCITY; WIND TUNNELS; Fog Oil; Threatened and endangered species; smoke; insect; toxicity; wind tunnel; risk assessment; obscurents

Citation Formats

Driver, Crystal J., Strenge, Dennis L., Su, Yin-Fong, Cullinan, Valerie I., Herrington, Ricky S., Saunders, Danielle L., and Rogers, Lee E. Methods for Assessing the Impact of Fog Oil Smoke on Availability, Palatability, & Food Quality of Relevant Life Stages of Insects for Threatened and Endangered Species. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/1043145.
Driver, Crystal J., Strenge, Dennis L., Su, Yin-Fong, Cullinan, Valerie I., Herrington, Ricky S., Saunders, Danielle L., & Rogers, Lee E. Methods for Assessing the Impact of Fog Oil Smoke on Availability, Palatability, & Food Quality of Relevant Life Stages of Insects for Threatened and Endangered Species. United States. doi:10.2172/1043145.
Driver, Crystal J., Strenge, Dennis L., Su, Yin-Fong, Cullinan, Valerie I., Herrington, Ricky S., Saunders, Danielle L., and Rogers, Lee E. Sun . "Methods for Assessing the Impact of Fog Oil Smoke on Availability, Palatability, & Food Quality of Relevant Life Stages of Insects for Threatened and Endangered Species". United States. doi:10.2172/1043145. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1043145.
@article{osti_1043145,
title = {Methods for Assessing the Impact of Fog Oil Smoke on Availability, Palatability, & Food Quality of Relevant Life Stages of Insects for Threatened and Endangered Species},
author = {Driver, Crystal J. and Strenge, Dennis L. and Su, Yin-Fong and Cullinan, Valerie I. and Herrington, Ricky S. and Saunders, Danielle L. and Rogers, Lee E.},
abstractNote = {A methodology for quantifying population dynamics and food source value of insect fauna in areas subjected to fog oil smoke was developed. Our approach employed an environmentally controlled re-circulating wind tunnel outfitted with a high-heat vaporization and re-condensation fog oil generator that has been shown to produce aerosols of comparable chemistry and droplet-size distribution as those of field releases of the smoke. This method provides reproducible exposures of insects under realistic climatic and environmental conditions to fog oil aerosols that duplicate chemical and droplet-size characteristics of field releases of the smoke. The responses measured take into account reduction in food sources due to death and to changes in availability of relevant life stages of insects that form the prey base for the listed Threatened and Endangered Species. The influence of key environmental factors, wind speed and canopy structure on these responses were characterized. Data generated using this method was used to develop response functions related to particle size, concentration, wind speed, and canopy structure that will allow military personnel to assess and manage impacts to endangered species from fog oil smoke used in military training.},
doi = {10.2172/1043145},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • Exposure to smokes and obscurants is perceived to constitute a potential negative impact on individuals or populations of threatened and endangered species present in training areas. This research provides a preliminary assessment of the environmental impacts of fog oil smoke used in training exercises based on available data and information (and assumptions stated in the report), especially as they might affect threatened and endangered species. This research also identifies specific data and information gaps that should be the focus of future research efforts.
  • The stated purpose of the Endangered Species Act is to provide a means whereby the ecosystem upon which endangered species and threatened species depend may be conserved. Conservation of the Columbia River ecosystem and the diversity of gene pools, life histories, species, and communities that comprise it, should become a major objective of species recovery and fish and wildlife management programs in the Columbia River Basin. Biodiversity is important to both species and ecosystem health, and is a prerequisite to long-term sustainability of biological resources. In this paper, I provide an overview of various approaches to defining, measuring, monitoring, andmore » protecting biodiversity. A holistic approach is stressed that simultaneously considers diverse species and resource management needs. Emphasis is on threatened and endangered species of salmon and their associated habitat.« less
  • This is the second of a two-part study of plant species on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that are listed as possibly threatened or endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). This study was undertaken as a response by DOE to comply with the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (the Act). Part 1 treated species listed under terms of the Act as proposed endangered species. Part 2 primarily treats those species listed as threatened species candidates. Among the 15 species that grow on NTS and appeared in the Federal Register lists of candidate threatened species we report three:more » Astragalus funereus, Coryphantha vivipara var. rosea, and Gilia ripleyi, that should be considered as threatened. Two other species which occur on NTS and were not included on either the threatened or endangered lists should also be classified as threatened: Penstemon thurberi var. anestius and Sclerocactus polyancistrus. Of the 12 other species originally listed in the Federal Register, eight are of sufficient interest to warrant continued monitoring under a category we suggest as ''Plants of Special Concern.'' The other four do not appear to require any protective measures or surveillance at this time. We suggest critical habitats for those species recommended for threatened status and note that some suggested critical habitats may serve for more than one species and may also include habitats for some species of special concern. Updated information about species covered in Part 1 suggests that Trifolium andersonii var. beatleyae, earlier considered endangered, should now be recommended to be removed from endangered or threatened status because of more widespread distribution than was known to us at the time Part 1 was published.« less
  • This Handbook is used to prepare or complete actions to list, delist, or reclassify endangered or threatened species. The handbook provides technical guidelines for the preparation of any notice, proposed rule, or final rule relating to endangered species listings, delistings, reclassifications, critical habitat designation, special rules, petition findings, and experimental populations. The handbook will assist managers, biologists, and clerical staffs in the preparation of listing documents.
  • Eight plant species which occur on NTS and one which occurs just outside the west boundary have been suggested by the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) as endangered plants in Nevada under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. This survey provides a basis for suggesting that seven of the nine species remain as candidates for the endangered status, and that two be removed from the threatened status. The following species are recommended for the endangered status: Astragalus beatleyae, Astragalus nyensis, Lathyrus hitchcockianus, Trifolium andersonii ssp. beatleyae, Frasera pahutensis, Phacelia beatleyae, and Camissonia megalantha. Two recommended for the threatened status aremore » Penstemon pahutensis and Arctomecon merriamii. In addition we suggest that two species not previously listed for Nevada by FWS be considered as endangered. These are Phacelia parishii, found for the first time since 1941 on NTS, and Galium hilendiae ssp. kingstonense, previously listed as a candidate for endangered status for California but not for Nevada.« less