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Title: Microbial communities acclimate to recurring changes in soil redox potential status

Abstract

Rapidly fluctuating environmental conditions can significantly stress organisms, particularly when fluctuations cross thresholds of normal physiological tolerance. Redox potential fluctuations are common in humid tropical soils, and microbial community acclimation or avoidance strategies for survival will in turn shape microbial community diversity and biogeochemistry. To assess the extent to which indigenous bacterial and archaeal communities are adapted to changing in redox potential, soils were incubated under static anoxic, static oxic or fluctuating redox potential conditions, and the standing (DNA-based) and active (RNA-based) communities and biogeochemistry were determined. Fluctuating redox potential conditions permitted simultaneous CO{sub 2} respiration, methanogenesis, N{sub 2}O production and iron reduction. Exposure to static anaerobic conditions significantly changed community composition, while 4-day redox potential fluctuations did not. Using RNA: DNA ratios as a measure of activity, 285 taxa were more active under fluctuating than static conditions, compared with three taxa that were more active under static compared with fluctuating conditions. These data suggest an indigenous microbialcommunity adapted to fluctuating redox potential.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1042561
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 1462-2912
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS; AVOIDANCE; BIOGEOCHEMISTRY; DNA; FLUCTUATIONS; IRON; PRODUCTION; REDOX POTENTIAL; RESPIRATION; RNA; SOILS; TOLERANCE; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

DeAngelis, Kristen M., Silver, Whendee, Thompson, Andrew, and Firestone, Mary K. Microbial communities acclimate to recurring changes in soil redox potential status. United States: N. p., 2010. Web. doi:10.1111/j.1462-2920.2010.02286.x.
DeAngelis, Kristen M., Silver, Whendee, Thompson, Andrew, & Firestone, Mary K. Microbial communities acclimate to recurring changes in soil redox potential status. United States. doi:10.1111/j.1462-2920.2010.02286.x.
DeAngelis, Kristen M., Silver, Whendee, Thompson, Andrew, and Firestone, Mary K. Fri . "Microbial communities acclimate to recurring changes in soil redox potential status". United States. doi:10.1111/j.1462-2920.2010.02286.x.
@article{osti_1042561,
title = {Microbial communities acclimate to recurring changes in soil redox potential status},
author = {DeAngelis, Kristen M. and Silver, Whendee and Thompson, Andrew and Firestone, Mary K.},
abstractNote = {Rapidly fluctuating environmental conditions can significantly stress organisms, particularly when fluctuations cross thresholds of normal physiological tolerance. Redox potential fluctuations are common in humid tropical soils, and microbial community acclimation or avoidance strategies for survival will in turn shape microbial community diversity and biogeochemistry. To assess the extent to which indigenous bacterial and archaeal communities are adapted to changing in redox potential, soils were incubated under static anoxic, static oxic or fluctuating redox potential conditions, and the standing (DNA-based) and active (RNA-based) communities and biogeochemistry were determined. Fluctuating redox potential conditions permitted simultaneous CO{sub 2} respiration, methanogenesis, N{sub 2}O production and iron reduction. Exposure to static anaerobic conditions significantly changed community composition, while 4-day redox potential fluctuations did not. Using RNA: DNA ratios as a measure of activity, 285 taxa were more active under fluctuating than static conditions, compared with three taxa that were more active under static compared with fluctuating conditions. These data suggest an indigenous microbialcommunity adapted to fluctuating redox potential.},
doi = {10.1111/j.1462-2920.2010.02286.x},
journal = {Environmental Microbiology},
issn = {1462-2912},
number = 12,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = {2010},
month = {12}
}