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Title: MATERIALS MODELING - A KEY FOR THE DESIGN OF ADVANCED HIGH TEMPERATURE REACTOR COMPONENTS

Abstract

The safe and reliable performance of advanced fission plants is dependent on the choice of suitable materials and assessment of long-term materials degradation. These materials are degraded by their exposure to high temperatures, irradiation and a corrosive environment, therefore it is necessary to address the issue of long term damage evolution of materials under service exposure in advanced plants. A higher confidence in life-time assessments of these materials requires an understanding of the related physical phenomena on a range of scales from the microscopic level of single defect damage effects all the way up to macroscopic effects. To understand the many different phenomena present, such a study needs to encompass broad time and length scales starting from atomistic descriptions of primary damage formation and ending with a description of bulk property behaviour at the continuum limit. This paper discusses the multi-scale, multi-code simulations and multi-dimensional validation experiments undertaken to understand the mechanical properties of these materials. Such a multiscale modelling and experimental approach is envisaged and will probe beyond currently possible approaches to become a predictive tool in estimating lifetimes and mechanical properties of materials.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland
  2. CEA, Cetre de Sacaly, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
  3. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1041093
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International Congress on Advances in Nuclear Power Plants, Nice, France, 20070513, 20070516
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Samaras, Maria, Hoffelner, Wolfgang, Fu, Chu-chun, Guttmann, Michel, and Stoller, Roger E. MATERIALS MODELING - A KEY FOR THE DESIGN OF ADVANCED HIGH TEMPERATURE REACTOR COMPONENTS. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Samaras, Maria, Hoffelner, Wolfgang, Fu, Chu-chun, Guttmann, Michel, & Stoller, Roger E. MATERIALS MODELING - A KEY FOR THE DESIGN OF ADVANCED HIGH TEMPERATURE REACTOR COMPONENTS. United States.
Samaras, Maria, Hoffelner, Wolfgang, Fu, Chu-chun, Guttmann, Michel, and Stoller, Roger E. Mon . "MATERIALS MODELING - A KEY FOR THE DESIGN OF ADVANCED HIGH TEMPERATURE REACTOR COMPONENTS". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1041093,
title = {MATERIALS MODELING - A KEY FOR THE DESIGN OF ADVANCED HIGH TEMPERATURE REACTOR COMPONENTS},
author = {Samaras, Maria and Hoffelner, Wolfgang and Fu, Chu-chun and Guttmann, Michel and Stoller, Roger E},
abstractNote = {The safe and reliable performance of advanced fission plants is dependent on the choice of suitable materials and assessment of long-term materials degradation. These materials are degraded by their exposure to high temperatures, irradiation and a corrosive environment, therefore it is necessary to address the issue of long term damage evolution of materials under service exposure in advanced plants. A higher confidence in life-time assessments of these materials requires an understanding of the related physical phenomena on a range of scales from the microscopic level of single defect damage effects all the way up to macroscopic effects. To understand the many different phenomena present, such a study needs to encompass broad time and length scales starting from atomistic descriptions of primary damage formation and ending with a description of bulk property behaviour at the continuum limit. This paper discusses the multi-scale, multi-code simulations and multi-dimensional validation experiments undertaken to understand the mechanical properties of these materials. Such a multiscale modelling and experimental approach is envisaged and will probe beyond currently possible approaches to become a predictive tool in estimating lifetimes and mechanical properties of materials.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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