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Title: Polarisation observables for strangeness photoproduction on a frozen spin target with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

Abstract

The FROST experiment at Jefferson Lab used the CLAS detector in Hall B with the intention of performing a complete measurement of polarization observables associated with strangeness photoproduction, in combination with data from previous JLab experiments. This was achieved by utilizing the FROST polarized target in conjunction with polarized photon beams, allowing direct measurement of beam-target double polarization observables. By studying strangeness reactions, such as {gamma}p {yields} K{sup +}{Lambda}{sup 0}, it may be possible to find 'missing' baryon resonances, predicted by symmetric quark models but not observed in previous experiments, whose results are consistent with the di-quark model. It is thought these 'missing' resonances remain undiscovered because they have different coupling strengths for different reaction channels, such as the strangeness reactions, whereas the current data is dominated by studies of pN reactions. Observing these resonances therefore has important implications for our knowledge of the excited states of nucleons, and the models predicting the quark interactions within them. The G polarization observable is one of the beam-target double polarization observables, associated with a longitudinally polarized target and a linearly polarized photon beam, and its measurement for the strangeness reaction {gamma}p {yields} K{sup +}{Lambda}{sup 0} is the focus of the work presented.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1038727
Report Number(s):
JLAB-PHY-11-1499; DOE/OR/23177-2066
TRN: US1201974
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-06OR23177
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AIP Conf. Proc.; Journal Volume: 1432; Conference: NSTAR 11, 17-20 May 2011, Newport News, VA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; BARYONS; EXCITED STATES; FROST; NUCLEONS; PHOTON BEAMS; PHOTOPRODUCTION; POLARIZATION; POLARIZED TARGETS; QUARK MODEL; QUARKS; SPIN; STRANGENESS; TARGETS

Citation Formats

Stuart Fegan. Polarisation observables for strangeness photoproduction on a frozen spin target with CLAS at Jefferson Lab. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1063/1.3701221.
Stuart Fegan. Polarisation observables for strangeness photoproduction on a frozen spin target with CLAS at Jefferson Lab. United States. doi:10.1063/1.3701221.
Stuart Fegan. Sun . "Polarisation observables for strangeness photoproduction on a frozen spin target with CLAS at Jefferson Lab". United States. doi:10.1063/1.3701221.
@article{osti_1038727,
title = {Polarisation observables for strangeness photoproduction on a frozen spin target with CLAS at Jefferson Lab},
author = {Stuart Fegan},
abstractNote = {The FROST experiment at Jefferson Lab used the CLAS detector in Hall B with the intention of performing a complete measurement of polarization observables associated with strangeness photoproduction, in combination with data from previous JLab experiments. This was achieved by utilizing the FROST polarized target in conjunction with polarized photon beams, allowing direct measurement of beam-target double polarization observables. By studying strangeness reactions, such as {gamma}p {yields} K{sup +}{Lambda}{sup 0}, it may be possible to find 'missing' baryon resonances, predicted by symmetric quark models but not observed in previous experiments, whose results are consistent with the di-quark model. It is thought these 'missing' resonances remain undiscovered because they have different coupling strengths for different reaction channels, such as the strangeness reactions, whereas the current data is dominated by studies of pN reactions. Observing these resonances therefore has important implications for our knowledge of the excited states of nucleons, and the models predicting the quark interactions within them. The G polarization observable is one of the beam-target double polarization observables, associated with a longitudinally polarized target and a linearly polarized photon beam, and its measurement for the strangeness reaction {gamma}p {yields} K{sup +}{Lambda}{sup 0} is the focus of the work presented.},
doi = {10.1063/1.3701221},
journal = {AIP Conf. Proc.},
number = ,
volume = 1432,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2012},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2012}
}

Conference:
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  • The study of baryon resonances provides a deeper understanding of the strong interaction because the dynamics and relevant degrees of freedom hidden within them are re ected by the properties of the excited states of baryons. Higher-lying excited states at and above 1.7 GeV/c2 are generally predicted to have strong couplings to final states involving a heavier meson, e. g. one of the vector mesons, ρ, ω φ, as compared to a lighter pseudoscalar meson, e. g. π and η. Decays to the ππΝ final states via πΔ also become more important through the population of intermediate resonances. We observemore » that nature invests in mass rather than momentum. The excited states of the nucleon are usually found as broadly overlapping resonances which may decay into a multitude of final states involving mesons and baryons. Polarization observables make it possible to isolate single resonance contributions from other interference terms. The CLAS g9 (FROST) experiment, as part of the N* spectroscopy program at Je?erson Laboratory, accumulated photoproduction data using circularly- & linearly-polarized photons incident on a transversely-polarized butanol target (g9b experiment) in the photon energy range 0:3-2:4 GeV & 0:7-2:1 GeV, respectively. In this work, the analysis of reactions and polarization observables which involve two charged pions, either in the fully exclusive reaction γρ -> ρπ+π- or in the semi-exclusive reaction with a missing neutral pion, γρ -> ρπ+π-(π0) will be presented. For the reaction ρπ+π-, eight polarization observables (Is, Ic, Px, Py, Psx; y, Pcx; y) have been extracted. The high statistics data rendered it possible to extract these observables in three dimensions. All of them are first-time measurements. The fairly good agreement of Is, Ic obtained from this analysis with the experimental results from a previous CLAS experiment provides support for the first-time measurements. For the reaction γρ -> ρω -> ρπ+π(π0, five polarization observables (T, Σ, F, H, P) have been extracted, four of which are first-time measurements at all energies. This analysis thus represents a comprehensive program on vector-meson photoproduction: The ω is observed and studied directly from the data and the polarization observables for the (broad) ω can be extracted from the double-pion reaction in a partial-wave analysis. The 13 polarization observables extracted in this analysis substantially augment the world database of polarization observables for these reactions and are expected to play a crucial role in identifying the contributing baryon resonances.« less
  • Polarization observables are vital for disentangling overlapping resonances in the baryon spectrum. Extensive data have been collected at Jefferson Lab in Hall B with circularly and linearly polarized tagged photon beam incident on longitudinally polarized protons provided by the Frozen Spin Target (FROST). The focus of the described work is on η photoproduction, which acts as an "isospin filter", isolating the N*(I = 1/2) resonances. Preliminary results for the double-polarization observables E and G are presented. There are currently no data on these in the world database for η photoproduction.
  • The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab has been used to measure the elementary photoproduction of kaons and hyperons in the energy range of the nucleon resonances. Data have been obtained for the reactions gamma + p --> K{sup +} + {Lambda}, Sigma{sup o}, Lambda(1405)/Sigma(1385), Lambda(1520). These channels test our understanding of pseudoscalar meson photoproduction, and may extend our knowledge of the spectrum of non-strange baryons which decay to strangeness-containing final states.
  • Large, portable frozen-spin HD (Deuterium-Hydride) targets have been developed for studying nucleon spin properties with low backgrounds. Protons and Deuterons in HD are polarized at low temperatures (~10mK) inside a vertical dilution refrigerator (Oxford Kelvinox-1000) containing a high magnetic field (up to 17T). The targets reach a frozen-spin state within a few months, after which they can be cold transferred to an In-Beam Cryostat (IBC). The IBC, a thin-walled dilution refrigerator operating either horizontally or vertically, is use with quasi-4{pi} detector systems in open geometries with minimal energy loss for exiting reaction products in nucleon structure experiments. The first applicationmore » of this advanced target system has been used for Spin Sum Rule experiments at the LEGS facility in Brookhaven National Laboratory. An improved target production and handling system has been developed at Jefferson Lab for experiments with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, CLAS.« less
  • A brief overview of strangeness physics with the CLAS detector at JLab is given, mainly covering the domain of nucleon resonances. Several excited states predicted by the symmetric constituent quark model may have signiffcant couplings to the K+ or K0 channels. I will discuss data that are relevant in the search for such states in the strangeness channel, and give an outlook on the future prospects of the N* program at JLab with electromagnetic probes.